21-09-1867: St Paul’s Cathedral, Sale, Gippsland, Victoria, Australia.

The Dr. Floyd Minter Peck memorial stained glass window was created by the Ferguson & Urie stained glass company of North Melbourne and was erected in St Paul’s Anglican Cathedral, Sale, Victoria, in September 1867.

Gippsland Times, Saturday September 21st 1867, page 2.

“During the past week the central lights of the east window in the chancel of St. Paul’s has been filled with stained glass. The window, which is sixteen feet high and three feet wide, has been erected by a few friends as a memorial to Dr. Peck, one of the earliest trustees and an earnest supporter and benefactor of the church. The painful circumstances of his death, in the prime of his manhood, are still fresh in the recollections of the inhabitants of the district. His death was caused by disease in conducting a post-mortem examination, and was justly regarded as a public misfortune. A subscription was initiated to erect a tablet to his memory, but it was afterwards resolved that a testimonial to his worth would be most appropriately placed in the new church, for which he had worked so long and zealously in raising funds; the present form of memorial was then wisely determined on. The general effect is extremely pleasing; the hues are clear, brilliant, and admirably arranged, and give to the church the colour so much needed. It is lancet shaped; the border is of green leaves; the lancet contains a fine scroll, with the words “Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord.” The centre is filled with a large figure of Christ as the Saviour of the world, with a nimbus round the head, and holding and orb typical of sovereignty; underneath are the words “Salvator mundi;” the lower part is filled with grisaille, enclosing a shield with the following inscriptions, in early English characters:- “Erected by subscription, in pious memory of Floyd Minter Peck, surgeon of this town, who died January 17, 1864.” A bright monogram of the Alpha and Omega shine at the apex of the window. The diapering and tracery generally are, very light and effective, and reflect great credit on the artists who executed them. It is a further subject of congratulation that this splendid window has been designed and chiefly manufactured in the colony by Messrs. Ferguson, Urie, and Lyon, of North Melbourne, who have been for some time past actively engaged on the work, which they have now brought to such a creditable conclusion.”

The centre light of the three windows in the chancel is the Dr. Floyd Minter Peck memorial window by Ferguson & Urie and it originally came from the first church built in Raymond Street Sale. The left light is also by Ferguson & Urie and is a memorial to Edward Crooke, but was created nearly two decades later and erected in September 1886. In 1887 Melbourne stained glass craftsman William Montgomery created the right light depicting the Good Shepherd and is a memorial to Menie Peck, the second wife of Dr. Ffloyd Minter Peck.

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Geelong Advertiser, Vic, Thursday 26th September 1867, page 2.

“During the past week the central light of the east window in the chancel of St. Paul’s Church, Sale, has been filled with stained glass. A local contemporary explains that the window, which is nineteen feet high and and three feet wide, has been erected by a few friends as a memorial to Dr Peck, one of the earliest trustees and earnest supporter and benefactor of the church, and whose death was caused by disease incurred by conducting a post mortem examination, and was justly regarded as a public misfortune. The general effect of the work is said to be extremely pleasing; the hues are clear, brilliant, and admirably arranged, and give to the church the colour so much needed. It is lancet shaped; the border is of green leaves; the lancet contains a fine scroll, with the words, “Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord.” The centre is filled with a large picture of Christ as the Saviour of the world, with a nimbus round the head, and holding an orb typical of sovereignty; underneath are the words “Salvator maudi;” [sic] the lower part is filled with grisaille, enclosing a shield with the following inscription in early English characters:- “Erected by subscription, in pious memory of Floyd Minter Peck, surgeon, of this town, who died January 17, 1864.” It is a subject of congratulation, as our contemporary remarks, that this splendid window has been designed and chiefly manufactured in the colony by Messrs Ferguson, Urie and Lyon, of North Melbourne.”

Monumental memories : Sale Cemetery / by Glenys Wain, Kylie Rhodes, Linda Barraclough:

"Dr. Floyd Minter Peck (c1818-1861) was the son of a doctor from Newmarket, England. He came to Australia with his brother in law Dr. Hedley, Dr. Reeve of Snakes Ridge and his brother James Peck. Dr. Peck married Anna Maria Robertson (1823-1859) who died in Sale soon after her arrival there, following the birth of her sixth child. Dr. Peck then married Menie Campbell (1820-1884), a sister in law of Robert Thomson. However shortly after their wedding Dr. Peck contacted an infection while performing an autopsy, and died five days later. Dr. Hedley took over his practice afte his sudden death. James Peck (c. 1833-1884) was the younger brother of Dr. Floyd Minter Peck, and lived at "Bowerette" near "Grassdale". He married Ada Minter (C.1846-1918), the daughter of a doctor from Mount Moriac, and became a successful stock agent. Near these two family plots are family plots for the Smith and Minters, who are related. All plots have similar fences, with gateways."

Related posts:

The 1885 Edward Crooke memorial window at St. Paul’s Cathedral, Sale by Ferguson & Urie.

External links:

The 1887 Menie Peck memorial window at St Paul’s Cathedral, Sale, by William Montgomery.

Homestead: Grassdale. Home of Floyd Minter Peck

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