1882: St Paul’s Launceston and Low Head, Tasmania.

Launceston and Low Head in Tasmania are only 56 kilometers from each other but in the 1860’s they might have been an entire world apart.

The ongoing quest to find the rare and historic stained glass windows crafted by the colonial ‘Ferguson & Urie’ company of North Melbourne sometimes create more questions than answers. After more than a century and a half the clues that lead to their existence are still being discovered.

Tenders for the construction of St Paul’s Anglican Church at Launceston were advertised in early October 1860[1] and on ‘All Saints Day,’ 1st November 1860 the foundation stone for a wooden church, to the designs of architect Peter Mills[2], was laid in Cleveland Street Launceston by Archdeacon Thomas Reiby [3].

On the 12th May 1861 the church was officially opened for services by Francis Russell Nixon , the Bishop of Tasmania[4].

It would be another twenty years before any stained glass windows were installed in St Paul’s although there was mention of an early chancel window previously being described as an: “ugly painted window”[5] and “…which so often became an eye-sore when the paint began to peel off…”[6] It’s highly likely that this ‘eye-sore’ of a window may have been a simple window film transfer known under various patent names such as ‘Vitrimanie,’ ‘Diaphanie,’ and ‘Chrystograph’.

In 1881 a member of the congregation who was only described as “A parishioner, in humble circumstances” had offered to pay for a new stained glass window for the chancel of St Paul’s. The Ferguson & Urie stained glass company of North Melbourne was commissioned to create the three light figurative stained glass window which was supposed to have been erected in the chancel and unveiled on Christmas day in 1881. Unfortunately the company responded that they couldn’t complete the window in time for the Christmas day ceremony and requested an extension, citing that they “wished to do the work well”[7].

By April 1882 the window had arrived from Melbourne and was erected in the chancel as intended. The window depicted Christ as three of the seven “I Am” sayings from the Gospel of John, being;
“I am The Resurrection and the Life” (John 11-25);
“I am The Good Shepherd” (John 10-11) and;
“I am The Light of the World” (John 8-12).

Photos taken by Gavin Merrington of “Original Stained Glass“, South Hobart, dated 19th August 2014

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

[View larger images]

The left light depicted Christ as the “Resurrection & the Life” with St Mark depicted above as the winged lion and at the base, St John as the Eagle.

In the centre light was Christ as “The good Shepherd” and above, the interwoven Greek symbols for Alpha and Omega and the letters ‘I.H.S’. Below Christ was the Agnus Dei or Paschal Lamb carrying the victory banner.

The right light depicted Christ as “The Light of the World” with St Mathew above as the Winged Man and below Christ is St Luke as the Winged Bull or Ox.

A further two single light windows by Ferguson & Urie, depicting St Peter and St Paul, were awaiting arrival for circa June 1882 and these were intended to be placed either side of the chancel window[8].

The next major stained glass window to be installed in St Paul’s was in 1886, although this window, depicting the Crucifixion, was obtained from the studio of E. R. Suffling of London. It arrived in late June 1886 aboard the “ss. Gulf of Mexico” and was erected in the liturgical west wall of the church[9]. The base of the centre light of this window contains the company name “E. R. Suffling & Co. Edgware Rd, London, England.”

St Paul’s church would serve the parishioners for the next 115 years but in the early 1970’s the development of the Launceston General Hospital was underway and St Paul’s was right in the path of the proposed plans. The church was eventually demolished c.1975 with some caveats specified regarding the recycling of the materials and artifacts from the church;

“…The demolition was agreed upon only if the hospital recycled the building as much as possible. Much of the fabric and contents of the St Paul’s church went to Low Head and were used in the construction of St Paul’s Chapel by the Sea…”[10]

During my early inquiries about the historic windows in the chapel at Low Head I was graciously sent a copy of a book about the history of Ainslie House which contains photos of the east three light window by Ferguson & Urie of North Melbourne and the west three light window by E. R. Suffling of London. There were no photos or evidence of the existence of the windows depicting St Peter and St Paul.

Thanks to Gavin Merrington of “Original Stained Glass” at South Hobart, it has now been confirmed, as of 19th August 2014, that all the historic windows are extant in St Paul’s Chapel at the Ainslie House aged care facility, Low Head, along with many other early 20th century stained glass from other artists and studios.

Ainslie House is a private Aged Care facility located at Low Head: 196-244 Low Head Road Low Head, Tasmania, Australia.


Significant transcriptions:

Launceston Examiner, Tasmania, Tuesday 27th December 1881, page 3.

“CHRISTMAS DAY ….”

“… As usual the church of St. Paul’s was decorated very chastely and effectively, and perhaps suffered no loss by comparison with more extensive Christmas decorations in previous years…”

“… At the close of the sermon in the morning, the incumbent alluded to one feature of Christmas greeting which he regretted the absence of, and which he hoped would be there that day, viz, a stained glass window for the chancel, which was to replace the painted one, which so often became an eye-sore when the paint began to peel off. A parishioner, in humble circumstances, had liberally offered to pay the cost of the new window, but through press of business Messrs Ferguson and Uril [sic], of Melbourne, had not been able to complete it in time for Christmas; and as they wished to do the work well, they asked a little extension of time. Probably a few weeks more will see this addition in its place, and it will not be the less welcomed through not making its first appearance at the Christmas festival.”

Launceston Examiner, Tasmania, Tuesday 11th April 1882, page 3.

“During Holy Week, owing to alterations, which were being made in connection with putting up the stained glass window in the Chancel of St. Paul’s Church, the daily service was held in the adjoining School-room….”

“… Before commencing the sermon in the evening, he alluded with feelings of thankfulness to the hearty and earnest services of Good Friday, and expressed his gratitude that the ugly painted window in the Chancel had given place to the handsome one, which those who were present in the morning had the privilege of witnessing the full effect of…”

“….and with pleasure announced that two additional stained glass windows had been liberally presented to the church, to be placed at the end of each aisle, right and left of the chancel. One window would represent St. Paul, whose name of the church and parish bear, and the other St. Peter, his brother apostle, and these windows would probably be finished in about three months. The chancel window, the noble and generous gift of a working man in the parish, consists of three lights; the central one containing a representation of Christ as the “Good Shepherd”, underneath this figure is the lamb with banner and cross, and above it the I.H.S., and alpha and omega in very rich colours. To the right is Christ as the “Light of the world;” above, the symbol of St. Mark, and below, that of St. John. To the left is Christ as the “Resurrection and the life,” with the symbol of St. Matthew above, and St. Luke below. Taken altogether the window is very pleasing and effective, and was supplied by Messrs Ferguson and Urie, of Melbourne, who will also provide the two additional windows….”

Examiner, Launceston, TAS, Wednesday 26th October 1904, page 7.

“ST. PAUL’S CHURCH. THE JUBILEE YEAR. AN INTERESTING RETROSPECT.

The present month has been a notable one in connection with St. Paul’s Church, which has reached its jubilee, and the event will be celebrated by a special function towards the end of the year. A few particulars regarding the history of the church should prove interesting.
The parish of St. Paul’s is bounded by the parishes of St. John’s and those of Perth and St. Leonards. In the year 1842 the population of Launceston had increased to such an extent as to render it necessary to relieve St. John’s of certain amount of work and responsibility, and therefore the northern portion of the town, with Brisbane-street as the dividing line, was formed into a separate cure, and Holy Trinity Church was erected. In 1851 the population still being on the increase, and stretching southward, it was found necessary to still further relieve St. John’s, and so another parish was formed, taking in all that portion of the town south of Balfour-street, and to be known as the parish of St. Paul’s. The mission district of Newnham, or Allenvale, situated about three miles from Launceston, on the George Town-road, was added to this parish. Here in the same year, 1851, a small church was erected and opened for divine service on April 27, by the Ven. Archdeacon Davies. This building is still in existence, and is used as a state school.
Mr. George Banks-Smith (afterwards canon and rector of St. George’s, Hobart) was first placed in charge of this parish as catechist. The first building used for divine service in St. Paul’s parish was the Frankland-street school; a building which was erected in the year 1847 and a school established there under the supervision of the chaplain of St. John’s. It was a strange looking old weatherboard structure of the bush hut style of architecture, and was perched up on a clay bank fronting the Frankland-street, and about midway between Charles and Wellington streets on the north side. The ‘Tasmanian Church Chronicle’ for November, 1854, contained the following account of the opening of the parish:- “On Sunday, October, 13, the opening of the new parish of St. Paul’s, Launceston (a sub division of St. John’s) took place. The sermon in the morning was preached by the Rev. P. V. M. Filleul, warden of Christ College, and in the afternoon by the lord Bishop of the Diocese. The building commonly known as the Frankland-street school room, has been temporarily fitted up for the performance of Divine worship, and on the occasion in question was well filled, the collection amounting to £25. The parish comprises a thickly populated part of Launceston, principally inhabited by the working classes, who have now the means of religious worship brought home to their doors with the benefits of a resident clergyman.”
The Rev. G. B. Smith worked hard in his new parish, and was ably assisted by the late Mr. Wm. Henty, Mr. and Mrs. Cleveland, and many others who formed the congregation in those days; and amongst those who took a great interest and did much to keep the congregation together at Newnham, were the late Messrs. Smith and Hutchinson, who, although residing in Launceston, walked backwards and forwards to the little mission church every Sunday, regardless of the weather. The Rev. G. B. Smith resigned the incumbency of St. Paul’s in 1859, and accepted the charge of St. George’s, Hobart. The parishioners then petitioned the Bishop to appoint the Rev. E. P. Adams (late Canon Adams), he being well known to them, having taken charge of the parish for a few months during the absence of the Rev. G. B. Smith in Sydney, but the Bishop required Mr. Adams’s services for the then newly formed parish of Mersey, and offered the incumbency of St. Paul’s to the Rev. Augustus Barkway, which he accepted.
It was not to be supposed that a congregation, especially a town one, would long put up with such a miserable building as that which served the purpose of a church in Frankland-street. Accordingly in 1860 a site was purchased, and on All Saint’s Day, November 1, the corner-stone of the present church, St. Paul’s, was laid by Archdeacon Reiby, assisted by the Rev’s. A. Barkway and John Chambers. In the short space of six months the building was completed, and opened for divine service on May 12, 1861, by Bishop Nixon. The building is of wood, in Gothic style of architecture, the dimensions being – Nave, 50ft x 32ft height 40ft; the chancel being 16ft x 13ft. The whole of the seats are composed of low benches, which have a remarkably neat appearance under the lofty nave. The church contains a very handsome font, a decorated Gothic altar rail and prayer desk, besides well carved lectern, made and presented by one of the parishioners.
After the opening of the church in 1861 the old Frankland-street building was still used as a Sunday school, but in 1863 a substantial stone and brick building was erected for the purpose on land adjoining the church. This land was generously given by three of the parishioners. The cost of the school building was £420. In the year 1867 money was raised and an organ procured at a cost of £150. On account of the increasing population it was found necessary in 1871 to enlarge the church, and this was done by the addition of another aisle.
At Easter, 1882, a handsome altar cloth and two windows, one to commemorate St. Paul and the other St. Peter,
were presented to the church by two of the parishioners. The beautiful chancel window was the noble and generous voluntary gift of a working class man. It consists of three lights, the central one containing a representation of Christ as the ‘Good Shepherd,’ underneath the figure is the Lamb with banner and cross, and above this I.H.S, and Alpha and Omega in very rich colours. To the right is Christ as the ‘Light of the World,’ above the symbol of St. Mark, and below that of St. John. To the left is Christ as the ‘Resurrection and the Life,’ with symbol of St. Matthew above, and that of St. Luke below.[11] A handsome memorial stained glass window was erected in the west end in 1886[12]; this was the gift of a very old family of parishioners, and another gave a carved cedar altar table, the old one being presented to the church at Frankford, in the Tamar parish.
In the year 1887, owing, unfortunately, to various causes, the congregation at the little mission church at Newnham having diminished, services, with the consent of the Bishop, were discontinued. The congregation of St. Paul’s have always looked well after their church, and entered heartily into ay scheme which would tend to increase and beautify it. The church has many benefactors. In addition to those already mentioned, the Cleveland family placed a beautiful painted window at the south end, and a marble cross was given by them also for the accommodation of a surpliced choir, and another gave a suitable brass altar desk. A handsome silver alms-dish and a silver altar table were also gifts to the church. The new chancel mentioned above was opened by the Bishop on September 19, 1888, and altogether the church, from a church man’s point of view, is the best appointed building in Launceston.
The Rev. Augustus Barkway has had charge of the parish for the last 45 years, and the many good qualities he possesses have endeared him to his congregation. The poor and afflicted have always been his special charge, and to them his kindly face is ever welcome.”

Tasmanian Govt, LINC, Record NG472, (accessed 24 Mar 2012)

“The Anglican Parish of St Paul’s was officially created and opened on 15 October 1854. Prior to this it was part of the Parish of St John’s, Launceston. It comprised the church of St Paul’s in Cleveland Street. On 5 October 1975 the final service was conducted in the church prior to its demolition to make way for redevelopment of the Launceston General Hospital on the church site. The demolition was agreed upon only if the hospital recycled the building as much as possible. Much of the fabric and contents of the St Paul’s church went to Low Head and were used in the construction of St Paul’s Chapel by the Sea, an interdenominational church which by c. 2000 was incorporated into the Ainslie House Aged Care Complex at Low Head. The chapel built at the redevelopment of the Launceston General Hospital was named St Paul’s chapel”.

The Organs Historical Trust of Australia, Christ Church Low Head, (accessed 24 Mar 2012)

“This substantial brick church was opened around 1980. It contains many fittings from St Paul’s Anglican Church, Launceston including the stained glass, memorial tablets and organ. St Paul’s was a large timber church to the south of the city centre close to the Launceston General Hospital”.

Footnotes:

[1] Launceston Examiner, Tas, Thursday 4th October 1860, page 1.

[2] Launceston Examiner, Tas, Saturday 3rd November 1860, page 3.

[3] Launceston Examiner, Tas, Tuesday 30th October 1860, page 2.

[4] Launceston Examiner, Tas, Thursday 9th May 1861, page 5.

[5] Launceston Examiner, Tasmania, Tuesday 11th April 1882, page 3.

[6] Launceston Examiner, Tasmania, Tuesday 27th December 1881, page 3.

[7] Launceston Examiner, Tasmania, Tuesday 27th December 1881, page 3.

[8] Launceston Examiner, Tasmania, Tuesday 11th April 1882, page 3.

[9] Launceston Examiner, Tas, Monday 5th July 1886, page 2.

[10] Tasmanian Govt, LINC, Record NG472, (accessed 24 Mar 2012)

[11] Windows made by Ferguson & Urie, Melbourne.

[12] Made by E. R. Suffling, London. (Ernest Richard Suffling 1855-1911)


Short link to this page: https://wp.me/p28nLD-2Cf

© Copyright

22-07-1866: St Paul’s Presbyterian Church, Ballan, Victoria.

St. Paul’s Presbyterian Church in Ballan, eastern Victoria, was officially opened 22nd of July 1866.

The following year, on the 13th August 1867, the Hobart Mercury reported that James Urie, one of the principal partners in the Victorian Stained glass firm of Ferguson & Urie, had been “sojourning” in Tasmania with a catalogue of the firm’s designs for ecclesiastical and secular stained glass. The Presbyterian Church at Ballan, St Paul’s, was mentioned in the article as one of many Victorian Churches that had recently received stained glass windows by Ferguson & Urie.

[…] This gentleman is now in Launceston, and we were much gratified yesterday by inspecting a large portfolio of designs for church and other windows which his firm has executed or has in hand […]

I visited St Paul’s (now a Uniting Church) in Ballan in December 2010 and found that all the windows were original Ferguson & Urie stained glass, none of which appear to have been repaired or restored since they were erected in the church over 140 years ago.

The principle triple light east window has the typical Ferguson & Urie scroll design. In the ribbon of the centre light is the verse from John 14-6: “I AM THE WAY AND THE TRUTH AND THE LIFE”

The text at the bottom of each lancet has the names of each of the donors:
“Ye gift of Mrs John Edols AD 1866” | “Ye gift of Mrs Dugald Macpherson AD 1866” | “Ye gift of Mrs Peter Ingles AD 1866”

Photos were taken 29 Dec 2010.
Some of the dark patches seen in the borders of some windows in the vestry are from a thick carpet of spider webs on the inside and outside of the windows.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The Donors:

Edols:

Mrs John Edols (Margaret) was the wife of John Edols Esq (1817-1888)., of Dariwell Park, he was appointed as a trustee[1] of the Ballan Race track and recreational reserve in July 1860, along with Dugald MacPherson and others and also acted as a steward[2] at the Ballan racing events. Margaret Edols (nee Brown) died[3] at “Ingliston” on the 17th of September 1872 and was buried in the Melbourne General Cemetery on the 19th of September 1872 [4]. John Edols left the Ballan area circa 1888 and died at “Bryan O’Lynn”, near Warrnambool on the 28th December 1888 [5]. He was buried at the Tower Hill Cemetery.

MacPherson:

Mrs Dugald MacPherson was Mary Elizabeth MacPherson (nee O’Cock), wife of Ballan Councillor Dugald Macpherson (1820-1901) of Bungeeltap. She died at Bungeeltap-house” at Ballan in August 1916 and was buried at the Ballan New Cemetery on Wednesday 16th August 1916[6]. Dugald MacPherson died at Bungeeltap, Ballan, on the 20th of October 1901 aged 81 [7] .

Inglis:

Mrs Peter Inglis, wife of Ballarat magistrate, Peter Inglis of Ingliston. Peter Inglis died on the 6th of July 1869, aged 73 [8].

HISTORY OF BALLARAT, page 6

“In the year 1843, Mr. Peter Inglis, who had a station at Ballan, took up the Warrenheip run, and shortly after that purchased the Lal Lal station, and throwing them both together, grazed on the united runs one of the largest herds in the colony. The western boundary of Mr. Inglis’ Warrenheip run marched with the eastern boundary of Mr. Yuille’s run, the line being struck by marked trees running from Mount Buninyong across Brown Hill to Slaty Creek. Mr. Donald Stewart, now of Buninyong, was stock-rider for Mr. Inglis, on the Warrenheip and Lal Lal stations, and superintendent during the minority of the present owner of Lal Lal”.

Related posts:  22-07-1866 > 28-07-1866 > 13-08-1867

External links:

Museum Vic: Dugald Macpherson (1820-1901)

Obituaries: Peter Inglis.

The Argus, Melbourne, Vic, Monday 12th July 1869, page 5.

Obituaries Australia

1872: St Paul’s Anglican Church, Avenel, Victoria.

St Paul’s Anglican Church is located in the tiny township of Avenel which lies a couple of kilometers west of the Hume Freeway, and about twenty kilometers north of the township of Semour in central Victoria.

The foundation stone of the first Anglican church in the town was laid on the 26th June 1872 and opened on the 24th November 1872.

From 1872 to 1913 the church was located closer to the Hume Highway, but in 1913 a new red brick church was erected further to the north west of the township and the original stained glass chancel window, made by Ferguson & Urie of North Melbourne, was re-installed in it.

Other windows in the church were made at much later dates (post 1913) and some of the borders in those either side of the chancel windows have been made to complement similar patterns seen in the historical Ferguson & Urie window.  The most recent window in the church was created by ‘Guan Wei’ at ‘Almond Glass’ works in 2008.

Photos taken: 18th December 2011.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The Seymour Express, Vic, Friday 10th April 1914, page 3.

“Consecration of St. Paul’s, Avenel. BY BISHOP OF WANGARATTA”.

“If there is one thing more than another of which the residents of Avenel have reason to be proud of it is the handsome and costly structures which they have dedicated to the service of God. The latest addition to these edifices has just been completed by the parishioners of St Paul’s church, and on Wednesday last was solemnly consecrated by the Right Rev. the Lord Bishop of Wangaratta, before a very large assemblage.

THE BUILDING

The church occupies a prominent position in the eastern portion of the town, and is a handsome structure – in the Gothic style of architecture, though very much modernised – of specially selected brick, with Portland cement facings. The foundation stone was laid on Nov 30th, 1913 in the presence of a very large gathering by Mr. E. Plummer J.P., the sermon for the occasion being also preached by the Bishop of Wangaratta. An account of the ceremony on parchment, mentioning the bishop, rector, church wardens and vestry men, was enclosed in a canister and placed under the stone. The eastern stained glass windows and the gable cross were transferred from the old church, which was built over 40 years ago. The lamps in the church were given by the vestry of St. John’s Church, Nagambie. The interior of the building is very handsome without being ornate. The chancel is wide and deep, and is spanned by a magnificent arch. The ventilation of the building has received special attention, there being an open ridge the full length of the building and while the walls are hollow to secure circulation of air and coolness they are fitted with the latest ventilators, which can be closed or shut as desired. The windows are of the very latest cathedral glass of a delicate green tint, and are made to open the full length of the window if necessary…”

Memories of Avenel by Amelia Jane Burgoyne 1958, page 48.

“In 1872, Lloyd Jones gave four acres of land, part of his property, to build an Anglican Church. On that site, in the old town, a pretty little church, St Paul’s was built, and was later beautified with stained-glass windows and some fine pieces of furniture presented by pioneer families in memory of their dear ones. The church was removed, about 1912, to the new town, somewhat to the regret of the older people, who had worshipped at the old site for forty years; but it is still the same pretty little church, though now on a site more convenient for the majority of residents. A recent addition to the interior fittings is the panelling of beautiful wood in the sanctuary, given by Mrs E. J. Shelton in memory of her husband, Captain John Shelton, who made the supreme sacrifice in the First World War”.


Short link to this page: https://wp.me/p28nLD-Qy

© Copyright

03-09-1889: St. Paul’s Church, Warragul, Victoria.

St Paul’s Anglican Church at Warragul is the home to two historic stained glass windows that were formerly in the old St Paul’s church in Melbourne.

The old St Paul’s, known as the Pro-Cathedral, was located on the corner of Flinders and Swanston Streets and was demolished in 1885 to make way for the new St. Paul’s Cathedral. Two single light stained glass windows, depicting St Peter and St Paul, were removed in mid 1885 just prior to its demolition. The whereabouts of the windows remained a mystery for the next four years.

Both windows were made by Ferguson & Urie of  North Melbourne and they resurfaced again in 1889 when the Gippsland tabloids wrote that Mr. James Burston had purchased them from the cathedral authorities and subsequently gifted them to the Warragul Church .

The windows were unveiled in St Paul’s church at Warragul on Sunday 6th October 1889, but again this would not be their last move. The Warragul church was originally a small timber building dating from circa 1881 and was replaced by the current brick building, the foundation stone having been laid by the Hon. William Pearson M.L.C. on the 29th July 1908.

The two windows were again saved and were re-erected in the new church either side of the chancel where they reside to this day.

Photos taken 4th December 2011.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

[View larger images]

Warragul Guardian and Buln Buln and Narracan Shire Advocate, Friday 13th September 1889, p3.

A very valuable gift has been made to St. Paul’s church, Warragul during the past week by James Burston Esq., of Melbourne, of two handsome stained glass windows representing St. Peter and St. Paul.  They were formerly in St. Paul’s Pro-Cathedral, Melbourne and were purchased by the donor from the Cathedral authorities.  It is expected that the ceremony of unveiling them will shortly be performed by one of the prominent Melbourne clergy, when special services will be held.  A useful addition has also recently been made of a beautifully worked blackwood pulpit, the handiwork of Mr. J. K.. Keen, now of Mildura.  The workmanship is remarkably good, and it would be a difficult matter, even in the city, to surpass it.”

Warragul Guardian and Buln Buln and Narracan Shire Advocate, Friday 4th October 1889, p2.

“The stained glass windows recently donated to St. Paul’s Church, Warragul, of which we gave a description, will be unveiled on Sunday next”

Warragul Guardian and Buln Buln and Narracan Shire Advocate, Tuesday 8th October 1889, p3.

“The stained glass windows which we recently noticed as having been presented to St. Paul’s Church, Warragul, by Mr. James Burston, of Melbourne, were unveiled on Sunday morning by the Rev. F. W. Willcox. As the coverings were removed their remarkable beauty was revealed to the public for the first time. St. Peter is represented with the usual key in his hands and St. Paul with the sword and the mellow and harmonious colorings were the subject of much comment at the conclusion of the service. The church committee may be congratulated upon the acquisition of what are really works of art, and it is hoped that before long some of the generously-minded will further beautify the church by adding stained glass to the centre window of the chancel”.

There were a number of other Ferguson & Urie windows in the old St Paul’s church in Flinders St, one of which was the three light chancel window dedicated to  the “Prince Consort”, which found its home in St. John’s at Sorrento.

Related posts:

27-07-1885: St Paul’s Pro Cathedral, Flinders St, Melbourne, Victoria.


Short link to this page: https://wp.me/p28nLD-FZ

© Copyright

27-12-1881: St Paul’s Anglican Church, Launceston, Tasmania.

In 1881 a Ferguson & Urie three light stained glass window depicting the “Resurrection and the life, Good Shepherd, and Light of the world” was supposed to have been erected in the chancel of St Paul’s, Launceston and unveiled on Christmas day 1881. Unfortunately the company couldn’t complete the window in time and requested an extension.

By April 1882 the three light chancel window was in place and at the same time two other single light windows by Ferguson & Urie, depicting St Peter and St Paul, were awaiting arrival to be subsequently placed either side of the chancel.

The church was demolished circa 1875 to make way for the Launceston Hospital.

The Ferguson & Urie window and others were relocated and now appear in St Paul’s Chapel by the Sea at Low Head.

Launceston Examiner, Tasmania, Tuesday 27th December 1881, page 3.

“CHRISTMAS DAY ….”

“… As usual the church of St. Paul’s was decorated very chastely and effectively, and perhaps suffered no loss by comparison with more extensive Christmas decorations in previous years…”

 “… At the close of the sermon in the morning, the incumbent alluded to one feature of Christmas greeting which he regretted the absence of, and which he hoped would be there that day, viz, a stained glass window for the chancel, which was to replace the painted one, which so often became an eye-sore when the paint began to peel off. A parishioner, in humble circumstances, had liberally offered to pay the cost of the new window, but through press of business Messrs Ferguson and Uril [sic], of Melbourne, had not been able to complete it in time for Christmas; and as they wished to do the work well, they asked a little extension of time. Probably a few weeks more will see this addition in its place, and it will not be the less welcomed through not making its first appearance at the Christmas festival.”

Launceston Examiner, Tasmania, Tuesday 11th April 1882, page 3.

“During Holy Week, owing to alterations, which were being made in connection with putting up the stained glass window in the Chancel of St. Paul’s Church, the daily service was held in the adjoining School-room….”

“… Before commencing the sermon in the evening, he alluded with feelings of thankfulness to the hearty and earnest services of Good Friday, and expressed his gratitude that the ugly painted window in the Chancel had given place to the handsome one, which those who were present in the morning had the privilege of witnessing the full effect of…”

“….and with pleasure announced that two additional stained glass windows had been liberally presented to the church, to be placed at the end of each aisle, right and left of the chancel. One window would represent St. Paul, whose name of the church and parish bear, and the other St. Peter, his brother apostle, and these windows would probably be finished in about three months. The chancel window, the noble and generous gift of a working man in the parish, consists of three lights; the central one containing a representation of Christ as the “Good Shepherd”, underneath this figure is the lamb with banner and cross, and above it the I.H.S., and alpha and omega in very rich colours. To the right is Christ as the “Light of the world;” above, the symbol of St. Mark, and below, that of St. John. To the left is Christ as the “Resurrection and the life,” with the symbol of St. Matthew above, and St. Luke below. Taken altogether the window is very pleasing and effective, and was supplied by Messrs Ferguson and Urie, of Melbourne, who will also provide the two additional windows….”

Tasmanian Govt, LINC, Record NG472, accessed 24 Mar 2012:

“The Anglican Parish of St Paul’s was officially created and opened on 15 October 1854. Prior to this it was part of the Parish of St John’s, Launceston. It comprised the church of St Paul’s in Cleveland Street. On 5 October 1975 the final service was conducted in the church prior to its demolition to make way for redevelopment of the Launceston General Hospital on the church site. The demolition was agreed upon only if the hospital recycled the building as much as possible. Much of the fabric and contents of the St Paul’s church went to Low Head and were used in the construction of St Paul’s Chapel by the Sea, an interdenominational church which by c. 2000 was incorporated into the Ainslie House Aged Care Complex at Low Head.  The chapel built at the redevelopment of the Launceston General Hospital was named St Paul’s chapel”.

The Organs Historical Trust of Australia record for Christ Church Low Head, accessed 24 Mar 2012:

“This substantial brick church was opened around 1980. It contains many fittings from St Paul’s Anglican Church, Launceston including the stained glass, memorial tablets and organ. St Paul’s was a large timber church to the south of the city centre close to the Launceston General Hospital”.


Short link to this page: https://wp.me/p28nLD-wU

© Copyright

 

 

26-04-1879: St Paul’s Presbyterian Church, Creek Street, Brisbane, Queensland.

In April 1879  Ferguson & Urie stained glass was represented in the Creek Street Presbyterian Church in Brisbane and was the gift of the Premier of Queensland, Sir Thomas McIllwraith (1835-1900).

In 1885 the Creek Street Presbyterian congregation were persuaded to sell their land to the Queensland National Bank for the sum of ₤18,750. As a result, the congregation acquired the Spring Hill property, which had been the site of the first Children’s Hospital. Much of the stonework from the demolished Creek Street Church was used in the new building as well as iron railings and gates, and the stained glass windows.

The foundation stone of the new church was laid at Spring Hill on the 8th of October 1887 and was dedicated in May 1889. The church is now known as St Paul’s, Spring Hill and still contains the original historic Ferguson & Urie windows which are now installed in pairs high up on the right and left above the chancel. The windows are arranged in pairs with the old testament characters ‘Isaiah’ & ‘Jeremiah’ on the left and ‘Ezekiel’ & ‘Daniel’ on the right.

Photos taken 01/03/2011.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The Brisbane Courier, Queensland, Saturday 26th April 1879, page 5.

 “A HANDSOM donation in the shape of four stained glass windows, has recently been made by a member of he congregation of the Creek-street Presbyterian Church. The windows which have been placed in the southern end of the building over the pulpit contain representations of the four Major Prophets – Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, and Daniel – the distinctive characteristics of each being beautifully illustrated, while the colors in each instance are so arranged as to have a very pleasing effect. The space in each window surrounding the design itself is filled in with an elegant geometric pattern, the whole being edged with a chaste bordering. In size the windows are each 12ft by 2ft, and are certainly on the whole the finest specimens of this branch of he art as yet to be seen in this city. The manufacturers are Messrs. Ferguson and Urie, of Melbourne, and their style in which they have turned out their work will compare favourably with that shown by the best English makers”.

Western Star and Roma Advertiser, Toowoomba, QLD, Monday 21st April 1879, page 2.

“Brisbane. [from our own correspondent] April 20.
VALUABLE PRESENTATION BY THE PREMIER
The hon T. McIllwraith, Premier and Colonial Treasurer, has just presented a stained glass window to the Creek-street Presbyterian Church.”

External links:

Biography: Sir Thomas McIllwraith (1835-1900)


Short link to this page: https://wp.me/p28nLD-tj

© Copyright

21-09-1867: St Paul’s Cathedral, Sale, Gippsland, Victoria, Australia.

The Dr. Floyd Minter Peck memorial stained glass window was created by the Ferguson & Urie stained glass company of North Melbourne and was erected in St Paul’s Anglican Cathedral, Sale, Victoria, in September 1867.

Gippsland Times, Saturday September 21st 1867, page 2.

“During the past week the central lights of the east window in the chancel of St. Paul’s has been filled with stained glass. The window, which is sixteen feet high and three feet wide, has been erected by a few friends as a memorial to Dr. Peck, one of the earliest trustees and an earnest supporter and benefactor of the church. The painful circumstances of his death, in the prime of his manhood, are still fresh in the recollections of the inhabitants of the district. His death was caused by disease in conducting a post-mortem examination, and was justly regarded as a public misfortune. A subscription was initiated to erect a tablet to his memory, but it was afterwards resolved that a testimonial to his worth would be most appropriately placed in the new church, for which he had worked so long and zealously in raising funds; the present form of memorial was then wisely determined on. The general effect is extremely pleasing; the hues are clear, brilliant, and admirably arranged, and give to the church the colour so much needed. It is lancet shaped; the border is of green leaves; the lancet contains a fine scroll, with the words “Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord.” The centre is filled with a large figure of Christ as the Saviour of the world, with a nimbus round the head, and holding and orb typical of sovereignty; underneath are the words “Salvator mundi;” the lower part is filled with grisaille, enclosing a shield with the following inscriptions, in early English characters:- “Erected by subscription, in pious memory of Floyd Minter Peck, surgeon of this town, who died January 17 [sic], 1864.” A bright monogram of the Alpha and Omega shine at the apex of the window. The diapering and tracery generally are, very light and effective, and reflect great credit on the artists who executed them. It is a further subject of congratulation that this splendid window has been designed and chiefly manufactured in the colony by Messrs. Ferguson, Urie, and Lyon, of North Melbourne, who have been for some time past actively engaged on the work, which they have now brought to such a creditable conclusion.”

The centre light of the three windows in the chancel is the Dr. Floyd Minter Peck memorial window by Ferguson & Urie. It originally came from the first church built in Raymond Street Sale. The article above has the date he died incorrect and so does the memorial text on the window. He actually died on the 7th of January 1863. The left light is also by Ferguson & Urie and is a memorial to Edward Crooke, but was created nearly two decades later and erected in September 1886. In 1887 Melbourne stained glass craftsman William Montgomery created the right light depicting the Good Shepherd and is a memorial to Menie Peck, the second wife of Dr. Ffloyd Minter Peck.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Geelong Advertiser, Vic, Thursday 26th September 1867, page 2.

“During the past week the central light of the east window in the chancel of St. Paul’s Church, Sale, has been filled with stained glass. A local contemporary explains that the window, which is nineteen feet high and and three feet wide, has been erected by a few friends as a memorial to Dr Peck, one of the earliest trustees and earnest supporter and benefactor of the church, and whose death was caused by disease incurred by conducting a post mortem examination, and was justly regarded as a public misfortune. The general effect of the work is said to be extremely pleasing; the hues are clear, brilliant, and admirably arranged, and give to the church the colour so much needed. It is lancet shaped; the border is of green leaves; the lancet contains a fine scroll, with the words, “Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord.” The centre is filled with a large picture of Christ as the Saviour of the world, with a nimbus round the head, and holding an orb typical of sovereignty; underneath are the words “Salvator maudi;” [sic] the lower part is filled with grisaille, enclosing a shield with the following inscription in early English characters:- “Erected by subscription, in pious memory of Floyd Minter Peck, surgeon, of this town, who died January 17, 1864.” It is a subject of congratulation, as our contemporary remarks, that this splendid window has been designed and chiefly manufactured in the colony by Messrs Ferguson, Urie and Lyon, of North Melbourne.”

Monumental memories : Sale Cemetery / by Glenys Wain, Kylie Rhodes, Linda Barraclough:

"Dr. Floyd Minter Peck (c1818-1861) was the son of a doctor from Newmarket, England. He came to Australia with his brother in law Dr. Hedley, Dr. Reeve of Snakes Ridge and his brother James Peck. Dr. Peck married Anna Maria Robertson (1823-1859) who died in Sale soon after her arrival there, following the birth of her sixth child. Dr. Peck then married Menie Campbell (1820-1884), a sister in law of Robert Thomson. However shortly after their wedding Dr. Peck contacted an infection while performing an autopsy, and died five days later. Dr. Hedley took over his practice afte his sudden death. James Peck (c. 1833-1884) was the younger brother of Dr. Floyd Minter Peck, and lived at "Bowerette" near "Grassdale". He married Ada Minter (C.1846-1918), the daughter of a doctor from Mount Moriac, and became a successful stock agent. Near these two family plots are family plots for the Smith and Minters, who are related. All plots have similar fences, with gateways."

Related posts:

The 1885 Edward Crooke memorial window at St. Paul’s Cathedral, Sale by Ferguson & Urie.

External links:

Paul Saban: “The Medical History of Newmarket”, Ffloyd Minter Peck (1820-1867)

The 1887 Menie Peck memorial window at St Paul’s Cathedral, Sale, by William Montgomery.

Homestead: Grassdale. Home of Floyd Minter Peck


Short link to this page: https://wp.me/p28nLD-9g

© Copyright