1882: St Paul’s Launceston and Low Head, Tasmania.

Launceston and Low Head in Tasmania are only 56 kilometers from each other but in the 1860’s they might have been an entire world apart.

The ongoing quest to find the rare and historic stained glass windows crafted by the colonial ‘Ferguson & Urie’ company of North Melbourne sometimes create more questions than answers. After more than a century and a half the clues that lead to their existence are still being discovered.

Tenders for the construction of St Paul’s Anglican Church at Launceston were advertised in early October 1860[1] and on ‘All Saints Day,’ 1st November 1860 the foundation stone for a wooden church, to the designs of architect Peter Mills[2], was laid in Cleveland Street Launceston by Archdeacon Thomas Reiby [3].

On the 12th May 1861 the church was officially opened for services by Francis Russell Nixon , the Bishop of Tasmania[4].

It would be another twenty years before any stained glass windows were installed in St Paul’s although there was mention of an early chancel window previously being described as an: “ugly painted window”[5] and “…which so often became an eye-sore when the paint began to peel off…”[6] It’s highly likely that this ‘eye-sore’ of a window may have been a simple window film transfer known under various patent names such as ‘Vitrimanie,’ ‘Diaphanie,’ and ‘Chrystograph’.

In 1881 a member of the congregation who was only described as “A parishioner, in humble circumstances” had offered to pay for a new stained glass window for the chancel of St Paul’s. The Ferguson & Urie stained glass company of North Melbourne was commissioned to create the three light figurative stained glass window which was supposed to have been erected in the chancel and unveiled on Christmas day in 1881. Unfortunately the company responded that they couldn’t complete the window in time for the Christmas day ceremony and requested an extension, citing that they “wished to do the work well”[7].

By April 1882 the window had arrived from Melbourne and was erected in the chancel as intended. The window depicted Christ as three of the seven “I Am” sayings from the Gospel of John, being;
“I am The Resurrection and the Life” (John 11-25);
“I am The Good Shepherd” (John 10-11) and;
“I am The Light of the World” (John 8-12).

Photos taken by Gavin Merrington of “Original Stained Glass“, South Hobart, dated 19th August 2014

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

[View larger images]

The left light depicted Christ as the “Resurrection & the Life” with St Mark depicted above as the winged lion and at the base, St John as the Eagle.

In the centre light was Christ as “The good Shepherd” and above, the interwoven Greek symbols for Alpha and Omega and the letters ‘I.H.S’. Below Christ was the Agnus Dei or Paschal Lamb carrying the victory banner.

The right light depicted Christ as “The Light of the World” with St Mathew above as the Winged Man and below Christ is St Luke as the Winged Bull or Ox.

A further two single light windows by Ferguson & Urie, depicting St Peter and St Paul, were awaiting arrival for circa June 1882 and these were intended to be placed either side of the chancel window[8].

The next major stained glass window to be installed in St Paul’s was in 1886, although this window, depicting the Crucifixion, was obtained from the studio of E. R. Suffling of London. It arrived in late June 1886 aboard the “ss. Gulf of Mexico” and was erected in the liturgical west wall of the church[9]. The base of the centre light of this window contains the company name “E. R. Suffling & Co. Edgware Rd, London, England.”

St Paul’s church would serve the parishioners for the next 115 years but in the early 1970’s the development of the Launceston General Hospital was underway and St Paul’s was right in the path of the proposed plans. The church was eventually demolished c.1975 with some caveats specified regarding the recycling of the materials and artifacts from the church;

“…The demolition was agreed upon only if the hospital recycled the building as much as possible. Much of the fabric and contents of the St Paul’s church went to Low Head and were used in the construction of St Paul’s Chapel by the Sea…”[10]

During my early inquiries about the historic windows in the chapel at Low Head I was graciously sent a copy of a book about the history of Ainslie House which contains photos of the east three light window by Ferguson & Urie of North Melbourne and the west three light window by E. R. Suffling of London. There were no photos or evidence of the existence of the windows depicting St Peter and St Paul.

Thanks to Gavin Merrington of “Original Stained Glass” at South Hobart, it has now been confirmed, as of 19th August 2014, that all the historic windows are extant in St Paul’s Chapel at the Ainslie House aged care facility, Low Head, along with many other early 20th century stained glass from other artists and studios.

Ainslie House is a private Aged Care facility located at Low Head: 196-244 Low Head Road Low Head, Tasmania, Australia.


Significant transcriptions:

Launceston Examiner, Tasmania, Tuesday 27th December 1881, page 3.

“CHRISTMAS DAY ….”

“… As usual the church of St. Paul’s was decorated very chastely and effectively, and perhaps suffered no loss by comparison with more extensive Christmas decorations in previous years…”

“… At the close of the sermon in the morning, the incumbent alluded to one feature of Christmas greeting which he regretted the absence of, and which he hoped would be there that day, viz, a stained glass window for the chancel, which was to replace the painted one, which so often became an eye-sore when the paint began to peel off. A parishioner, in humble circumstances, had liberally offered to pay the cost of the new window, but through press of business Messrs Ferguson and Uril [sic], of Melbourne, had not been able to complete it in time for Christmas; and as they wished to do the work well, they asked a little extension of time. Probably a few weeks more will see this addition in its place, and it will not be the less welcomed through not making its first appearance at the Christmas festival.”

Launceston Examiner, Tasmania, Tuesday 11th April 1882, page 3.

“During Holy Week, owing to alterations, which were being made in connection with putting up the stained glass window in the Chancel of St. Paul’s Church, the daily service was held in the adjoining School-room….”

“… Before commencing the sermon in the evening, he alluded with feelings of thankfulness to the hearty and earnest services of Good Friday, and expressed his gratitude that the ugly painted window in the Chancel had given place to the handsome one, which those who were present in the morning had the privilege of witnessing the full effect of…”

“….and with pleasure announced that two additional stained glass windows had been liberally presented to the church, to be placed at the end of each aisle, right and left of the chancel. One window would represent St. Paul, whose name of the church and parish bear, and the other St. Peter, his brother apostle, and these windows would probably be finished in about three months. The chancel window, the noble and generous gift of a working man in the parish, consists of three lights; the central one containing a representation of Christ as the “Good Shepherd”, underneath this figure is the lamb with banner and cross, and above it the I.H.S., and alpha and omega in very rich colours. To the right is Christ as the “Light of the world;” above, the symbol of St. Mark, and below, that of St. John. To the left is Christ as the “Resurrection and the life,” with the symbol of St. Matthew above, and St. Luke below. Taken altogether the window is very pleasing and effective, and was supplied by Messrs Ferguson and Urie, of Melbourne, who will also provide the two additional windows….”

Examiner, Launceston, TAS, Wednesday 26th October 1904, page 7.

“ST. PAUL’S CHURCH. THE JUBILEE YEAR. AN INTERESTING RETROSPECT.

The present month has been a notable one in connection with St. Paul’s Church, which has reached its jubilee, and the event will be celebrated by a special function towards the end of the year. A few particulars regarding the history of the church should prove interesting.
The parish of St. Paul’s is bounded by the parishes of St. John’s and those of Perth and St. Leonards. In the year 1842 the population of Launceston had increased to such an extent as to render it necessary to relieve St. John’s of certain amount of work and responsibility, and therefore the northern portion of the town, with Brisbane-street as the dividing line, was formed into a separate cure, and Holy Trinity Church was erected. In 1851 the population still being on the increase, and stretching southward, it was found necessary to still further relieve St. John’s, and so another parish was formed, taking in all that portion of the town south of Balfour-street, and to be known as the parish of St. Paul’s. The mission district of Newnham, or Allenvale, situated about three miles from Launceston, on the George Town-road, was added to this parish. Here in the same year, 1851, a small church was erected and opened for divine service on April 27, by the Ven. Archdeacon Davies. This building is still in existence, and is used as a state school.
Mr. George Banks-Smith (afterwards canon and rector of St. George’s, Hobart) was first placed in charge of this parish as catechist. The first building used for divine service in St. Paul’s parish was the Frankland-street school; a building which was erected in the year 1847 and a school established there under the supervision of the chaplain of St. John’s. It was a strange looking old weatherboard structure of the bush hut style of architecture, and was perched up on a clay bank fronting the Frankland-street, and about midway between Charles and Wellington streets on the north side. The ‘Tasmanian Church Chronicle’ for November, 1854, contained the following account of the opening of the parish:- “On Sunday, October, 13, the opening of the new parish of St. Paul’s, Launceston (a sub division of St. John’s) took place. The sermon in the morning was preached by the Rev. P. V. M. Filleul, warden of Christ College, and in the afternoon by the lord Bishop of the Diocese. The building commonly known as the Frankland-street school room, has been temporarily fitted up for the performance of Divine worship, and on the occasion in question was well filled, the collection amounting to £25. The parish comprises a thickly populated part of Launceston, principally inhabited by the working classes, who have now the means of religious worship brought home to their doors with the benefits of a resident clergyman.”
The Rev. G. B. Smith worked hard in his new parish, and was ably assisted by the late Mr. Wm. Henty, Mr. and Mrs. Cleveland, and many others who formed the congregation in those days; and amongst those who took a great interest and did much to keep the congregation together at Newnham, were the late Messrs. Smith and Hutchinson, who, although residing in Launceston, walked backwards and forwards to the little mission church every Sunday, regardless of the weather. The Rev. G. B. Smith resigned the incumbency of St. Paul’s in 1859, and accepted the charge of St. George’s, Hobart. The parishioners then petitioned the Bishop to appoint the Rev. E. P. Adams (late Canon Adams), he being well known to them, having taken charge of the parish for a few months during the absence of the Rev. G. B. Smith in Sydney, but the Bishop required Mr. Adams’s services for the then newly formed parish of Mersey, and offered the incumbency of St. Paul’s to the Rev. Augustus Barkway, which he accepted.
It was not to be supposed that a congregation, especially a town one, would long put up with such a miserable building as that which served the purpose of a church in Frankland-street. Accordingly in 1860 a site was purchased, and on All Saint’s Day, November 1, the corner-stone of the present church, St. Paul’s, was laid by Archdeacon Reiby, assisted by the Rev’s. A. Barkway and John Chambers. In the short space of six months the building was completed, and opened for divine service on May 12, 1861, by Bishop Nixon. The building is of wood, in Gothic style of architecture, the dimensions being – Nave, 50ft x 32ft height 40ft; the chancel being 16ft x 13ft. The whole of the seats are composed of low benches, which have a remarkably neat appearance under the lofty nave. The church contains a very handsome font, a decorated Gothic altar rail and prayer desk, besides well carved lectern, made and presented by one of the parishioners.
After the opening of the church in 1861 the old Frankland-street building was still used as a Sunday school, but in 1863 a substantial stone and brick building was erected for the purpose on land adjoining the church. This land was generously given by three of the parishioners. The cost of the school building was £420. In the year 1867 money was raised and an organ procured at a cost of £150. On account of the increasing population it was found necessary in 1871 to enlarge the church, and this was done by the addition of another aisle.
At Easter, 1882, a handsome altar cloth and two windows, one to commemorate St. Paul and the other St. Peter,
were presented to the church by two of the parishioners. The beautiful chancel window was the noble and generous voluntary gift of a working class man. It consists of three lights, the central one containing a representation of Christ as the ‘Good Shepherd,’ underneath the figure is the Lamb with banner and cross, and above this I.H.S, and Alpha and Omega in very rich colours. To the right is Christ as the ‘Light of the World,’ above the symbol of St. Mark, and below that of St. John. To the left is Christ as the ‘Resurrection and the Life,’ with symbol of St. Matthew above, and that of St. Luke below.[11] A handsome memorial stained glass window was erected in the west end in 1886[12]; this was the gift of a very old family of parishioners, and another gave a carved cedar altar table, the old one being presented to the church at Frankford, in the Tamar parish.
In the year 1887, owing, unfortunately, to various causes, the congregation at the little mission church at Newnham having diminished, services, with the consent of the Bishop, were discontinued. The congregation of St. Paul’s have always looked well after their church, and entered heartily into ay scheme which would tend to increase and beautify it. The church has many benefactors. In addition to those already mentioned, the Cleveland family placed a beautiful painted window at the south end, and a marble cross was given by them also for the accommodation of a surpliced choir, and another gave a suitable brass altar desk. A handsome silver alms-dish and a silver altar table were also gifts to the church. The new chancel mentioned above was opened by the Bishop on September 19, 1888, and altogether the church, from a church man’s point of view, is the best appointed building in Launceston.
The Rev. Augustus Barkway has had charge of the parish for the last 45 years, and the many good qualities he possesses have endeared him to his congregation. The poor and afflicted have always been his special charge, and to them his kindly face is ever welcome.”

Tasmanian Govt, LINC, Record NG472, (accessed 24 Mar 2012)

“The Anglican Parish of St Paul’s was officially created and opened on 15 October 1854. Prior to this it was part of the Parish of St John’s, Launceston. It comprised the church of St Paul’s in Cleveland Street. On 5 October 1975 the final service was conducted in the church prior to its demolition to make way for redevelopment of the Launceston General Hospital on the church site. The demolition was agreed upon only if the hospital recycled the building as much as possible. Much of the fabric and contents of the St Paul’s church went to Low Head and were used in the construction of St Paul’s Chapel by the Sea, an interdenominational church which by c. 2000 was incorporated into the Ainslie House Aged Care Complex at Low Head. The chapel built at the redevelopment of the Launceston General Hospital was named St Paul’s chapel”.

The Organs Historical Trust of Australia, Christ Church Low Head, (accessed 24 Mar 2012)

“This substantial brick church was opened around 1980. It contains many fittings from St Paul’s Anglican Church, Launceston including the stained glass, memorial tablets and organ. St Paul’s was a large timber church to the south of the city centre close to the Launceston General Hospital”.

 

Footnotes:

[1] Launceston Examiner, Tas, Thursday 4th October 1860, page 1.

[2] Launceston Examiner, Tas, Saturday 3rd November 1860, page 3.

[3] Launceston Examiner, Tas, Tuesday 30th October 1860, page 2.

[4] Launceston Examiner, Tas, Thursday 9th May 1861, page 5.

[5] Launceston Examiner, Tasmania, Tuesday 11th April 1882, page 3.

[6] Launceston Examiner, Tasmania, Tuesday 27th December 1881, page 3.

[7] Launceston Examiner, Tasmania, Tuesday 27th December 1881, page 3.

[8] Launceston Examiner, Tasmania, Tuesday 11th April 1882, page 3.

[9] Launceston Examiner, Tas, Monday 5th July 1886, page 2.

[10] Tasmanian Govt, LINC, Record NG472, (accessed 24 Mar 2012)

[11] Windows made by Ferguson & Urie, Melbourne.

[12] Made by E. R. Suffling, London. (Ernest Richard Suffling 1855-1911)

 

© Copyright

 

Advertisements

25-09-1866: St John’s Anglican Church, Launceston, Tasmania.

St John’s Anglican Church in Launceston contains a three-light Ferguson & Urie stained glass window representing the ‘Ascension’.

This window was originally erected in the chancel of St John’s in 1866 and later moved to the nave in the 1930’s, but in its current configuration it is missing the upper portions of the window above the three main lights.

The figures or emblems that may have been in the missing pieces have been a mystery until recently. A report of the window in September 1866 described the main body of the windows in detail and “…At the top is the figure of a dove…”[1] As luck would have it I found a copy of Ferguson & Urie’s original design for this window in the State Library of Victoria’s collections. In the original design, the tracery above the three main lights contains three quatrefoil shaped windows with the descending dove in the one at the apex and the symbols Alpha and Omega in the ones below. There are only minor differences in the figurative designs in comparison to the entire window that was actually made and these can be seen in the slideshow of photographs.

Interestingly, the bottom of the original design for the window has the date 1864 which, at minimum, is about nineteen months prior to when it was finally erected in St John’s!

Photos taken: 11th October 2011.
(The copy of Ferguson & Urie’s original design for the window is dated 1864).

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

[View larger images]

Lieutenant George Arthur (1784-1854), Governor of Tasmania, laid the foundation stone of St John’s Anglican Church at Launceston on the 28th of December 1824[2]. On the 19th of February 1826, the church was opened[3] for the first time by Archdeacon Thomas Hobbes Scott (1773-1860) assisted by the first incumbent, Rev John Youl (1773-1827).

Governor Arthur had disapproved of the original plans for St John’s and controversially made an executive decision to have it changed:

“…Sir George ARTHUR, without asking the opinion of any professional man, executive or other council, glanced at the plan, saw that a church built upon it would accommodate as large a congregation as the Colonial Cathedral in his Southern Metropolis[4]. He was a man of action – not words. Assuming at once that Launceston would scarcely ever require so large and extent of Church accommodation as the Architect proposed to provide, he struck a red ink pen mark across the plan of the body of the Church, cutting two windows, or more than one third of the entire length off…”[5]

Some of the most significant and controversial changes to the church began in the mid 1860’s. In February of 1866, in the vestry of St John’s, a meeting was held to discuss the erection of a chancel at the east end with plans and specifications by architect Peter Mills. At the same meeting there was also mention of the new stained glass window to be donated by Mr John Cameron Esq that would be erected in this new chancel:

“The beautiful illuminated window to be presented by John Cameron, Esq., on the enlargement of the church, will be placed in the Chancel. We have seen a photograph of this window, which is richly ornamented. The centre piece is the Ascension of our Saviour.”[6]

The chancel didn’t quite go as expected. It was generally understood by the Rev Dr. Browne and the Wardens that the new chancel would be built up to the height of the original church roof, but miscommunication between the church wardens, the contractor (J. W. Lloyd) and the misinterpretation of the architects plans, caused much confusion between the parties[7].

On Wednesday the 15th August, 1866 John Cameron’s stained glass window arrived from Ferguson & Urie’s workshops in Melbourne aboard the ‘Black Swan’:

The Cornwall Chronicle, Launceston, TAS, Saturday 18th August 1866, page 4.

“The beautiful illustrated window, the munificent gift of the late John Cameron. Esq., arrived here by the Black Swan on Wednesday. The Rev Dr Browne requires the architect’s certificate that the new chancel to St John’s Church is in a fit state to receive this beautiful work of art, and then it can be placed there.”

John Cameron was a staunch supporter and liberal donor to St John’s Church in Launceston. In February 1865 he suffered a serious stroke[8] and although it was reported in the following June that he was recovering[9] he only enjoyed mediocre health for a further year and on the 28th June 1866 suffered another stroke and died at his home ‘Oakburn’ in Launceston, aged 60 years[10]. He never saw his magnificent stained glass window. His obituary was published three days later:

The Cornwall Chronicle, Launceston, TAS, Saturday 30th June 1866, page 4.

“DEATH OF JOHN CAMERON, Esq.
We sincerely regret to announce the demise of John Cameron, Esq, J.P., an old colonist of high standing in this community. Mr Cameron had been attacked with paralytic and apoplectic fits last year, and for a time his recovery to health was doubtful. He soon became convalescent, however, and has enjoyed tolerable good health since. He drove into town almost daily from his residence, Oakburn, Elphin Road, and a short time back paid a visit to Hobart Town. He was in Launceston on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday last, and said he felt even in better health than usual, but about midnight on Wednesday night he had another fit of apoplexy, and though the usual means were promptly resorted to for his recovery, he sank and died at 10 o’clock on Thursday morning. Mr Cameron amassed a large fortune many years since in this colony by commerce, and since retiring from business he has paid several visits to England. He last returned to this colony some four or five years ago. He was respected and esteemed by all classes for his mild and charitable views and kindly disposition. He was attached to no political sector party; and considered that unanimity amongst the people would tend more to the prosperity of the country than division. Mr Cameron came to this colony about forty years ago at the age of twenty years, and has, therefore, spent nearly two-thirds of his lifetime in Tasmania. He was one of a class of sterling, hard working, successful men who by their energy and perseverance laid the foundations of prosperity in this colony. If the example set by Mr Cameron and other old colonists of his stamp was more closely followed, it would be well for the best interests of Tasmania. Mr Cameron was connected with some of the families of the highest standing in this colony, the present mayor of Hobart Town being his son-in-law, and few men had a wider circle of friends. His removal from amongst them will be felt throughout the colony as a serious loss.”

John Cameron’s funeral was held in St John’s on Tuesday the 3rd of July 1866, two months before his stained glass window was to be erected in the chancel of the church. In late September the Launceston Examiner reported that the window had been erected:

The Launceston Examiner, Tasmania, Tuesday 25th September 1866, page 2.

“RELIGIOUS INTELLIGENCE – CHURCH OF ENGLAND”
“The chancel in connection with St. John’s Church, Launceston, has been finished, and a portion of the service has been conducted in it. The Bishop, it is anticipated, will visit the north in a week or two, when the building will be consecrated. Two handsome stained-glass windows have been erected in the chancel. One is the gift of the late John Cameron, Esq., and represents the Ascension. A half figure of our Saviour is exhibited at the bottom of a centre light, and above that is the Ascension with the words beneath “I go to prepare a place for you.” On either side are the eleven Apostles, looking with wonder and adoration to their ascending Lord. At the top is the figure of a dove. The work does infinite credit to Messrs. Ferguson and Urie, of Melbourne, by whom it was designed and executed. The antique glass – which is a late discovery of the glass used by glass painters in the middle ages – has a very rich although subdued tone, and being heavy in substance gives great additional strength to the window. This contrasts favourably with the smaller window, the resurrection, the gift of the Rev. Dr. Browne, chaplain, in memory of the Venerable Archdeacon Hutchins, the first Archdeacon appointed to the diocese. This window is of common glass, by Headsland
[sic: ‘Hedgeland’]
, of London”.

Seven months after the erection of the window it was subjected to vandalism by boys with slingshots:

The Cornwall Chronicle, Launceston, TAS, Wednesday 8th May 1867, page 5.

“The use of the toy catapult has become a serious nuisance in Town. Schoolboys seem to consider that they have a prescriptive right to do damage to the full extent of the power of the catapult. Whether accidentally or on purpose, the beautiful memorial window in the chancel of St. John’s Church, the gift of the late John Cameron, Esq., has been injured in this way, and ladies and children are daily and hourly subjected to annoyance and danger from the juveniles armed with the catapult. The masters of schools have it in their power to check this nuisance by condemning the use of the catapult in the streets; and the police can also do much to out down this new species of entertainment, so dangerous to persons passing through the streets.”

The lower portions of the window show an extensive number of cracks in the small figure of Christ at the bottom of the window, but whether these were a result of the vandalism from more than a century ago is not known.

In September 2015, David Morris, from St John’s, Launceston, provided the following information in regards to the missing three quatrefoils from the window;

“I was reading your article on your website about a window designed and executed by Ferguson & Urie in 1866 for Mr John Cameron’s donation to St John’s Anglican Church in Launceston. In that article you refer to “the missing three quatrefoils depicting the Dove and Apha & Omega” that were part of the original window. I am happily able to report that those “missing” quatrefoils were saved, and are alive and well, and are on display in the same church, St John’s Church in Launceston, in a history display cabinet available to public view, properly labelled. Your article correctly records that these parts did not fit into the clerestory where the rest of the window has been for many years now.” [11]

Other related posts that mention this window:

13-08-1867: James Urie visits Tasmania on Ferguson and Urie business.
07-08-1867: Decorative Art. James Urie sojourning in Tasmania.

Footnotes:

[1] The Launceston Examiner, Tasmania, Tuesday 25th September 1866, page 2.

[3] Hobart Town Gazette, TAS, Saturday 25th February 1826, page 2.

[4] In reference to St David’s Cathedral in Hobart.

[10] The Cornwall Chronicle, Launceston, TAS, Saturday 30th June 1866, page 4.

[11] David Morris, St John’s, Launceston, Email, 12 Sep 2015.


 

Article short link: http://wp.me/p28nLD-1E0

© Copyright

20-10-1885: Christ Church, Frederick St, Launceston, Tasmania.

The Launceston City Baptist Church (former Prince’s Square Congregational and Christ Church Congregational Church) 11 Frederick Street, Launceston.

Launceston Examiner, Tasmania, Tuesday 20th October 1885, page 3.

“OPENING OF CHRIST CHURCH.”

“A handsome stained glass memorial window has been placed on the eastern side of the church near the north end, by Mr. C. S. Button, of Scottsdale, Mrs. Calvert, of Hobart, and Miss Helen Button, the present organist, in memory of their father, Mr. W. S. Button (first Mayor of Launceston), and their mother. The window was obtained from the firm of Messrs. Ferguson and Urie, Collins-street, Melbourne.”

Photos by Gavin Merrington taken 23rd June 2012.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

William Stammers Button (1795-1876) was born in Nayland, Suffolk, England. He arrived in Van Diemens Land (Tasmania) with his brother Thomas and other family members in 1833 aboard the ship “Forth,”[1] and initially starting business as a brewer in partnership with his brother-in-law, Jonathan Stammers Waddell, at Norfolk Plains (later known as Longford), and then at Launceston as “Button & Waddell”[2].

On New Years day in 1853, under much controversy and accusations of collusive fraud, the first elections for Aldermen for the town of Launceston were conducted[3]. Seven men were elected, one of whom was William Stammers Button (as well as his brother Thomas). Prior to the Aldermen retiring to elect the position of Mayor, each took the stand to address the crowd;

“William Williams, alias William Stammers Button advanced amidst a tornado of yells, groans, and hisses, and from what we could hear, we understood him to say – Gentlemen, I shall attend to my duties as well as I can. The public good I shall always endeavour to keep in view, and I will maintain it. The interests of the working man shall occupy my especial attention, and I will do all in my power to find employment – remunerative employment – for the free poor of this town. Gentlemen, I heartily thank you for the honor you have done me. (A voice – ‘much obliged to you – well done ali-ass Mr. Williams,’)” followed by groans and hisses.”

“…The successful candidates then retired to one of the apartments at the back of the court house to elect the mayor, when after the absence of about half an hour, the Sheriff, to the astonishment of every one present, declared William Williams, alias WILLIAM STAMMERS BUTTON, (brewer) first mayor of Launceston.”[4]

The reference to William Stammers Button as being William Williams is shrouded in controversy. Ten years earlier, in 1843, Button successfully won a law suit against a William Lushington Goodwin for “printing and publishing a malicious libel” against him in the Cornwall Chronicle[5], to which Goodwin was convicted and fined. After the election in 1853, further publications appeared to cast aspersions as his origins as the unknown William Williams[6].

William Stammers Button held the position of the Mayor of Launceston for four consecutive years and was universally admired for his efforts in the advancement of Launceston. He held many other public and private positions and in 1856 was elected to represent the Tamar district in the Legislative Council[7]. He was a liberal donor to all deserving institutions, and a served as a deacon of the Congregational church for over 40 years[8].

William Stammers Button died on the 17th September 1876 and was buried in the Mulgrave Square Cemetery in Charles street Launceston. The cemetery was closed for further interments in 1925[9].

In October 1885[10], the surviving children of William Stammers Button erected a stained glass window to his and his wife Marianne’s memory, in the City Baptist Church (former Christ Church Congregational) in Frederick Street, Launceston.

The window was crafted by the Colonial Victorian stained glass firm Ferguson & Urie of Melbourne.

The Mercury, Hobart, Tasmania, Wednesday 21st October 1885, page 3

“…On each side of the organ alcove there are round openings in the end wall, filled with geometrical designs on stained glass. There is also a stained glass window with a tablet, marked, “In loving memory of William Stammers Button, M.L.C, for nearly 40 years deacon of this church, also the first Mayor of Launceston, and Marianne, his wife, this window is dedicated.” The window, which bears the inscriptions on stained glass, “Blessed are the dead who die in the Lord,” and “Honour thy father and thy mother,” has been erected by Mr. C. S. Button, of Scottsdale, Mrs. Calvert, of Hobart, and Miss Helen Button, the organist of the church, the children of the deceased deacon.…”

The Mercury, Hobart, Saturday 26th January 1907, page 8.

“…There are some interesting, and indeed historic, memorials in Christ Church. A marble tablet perpetuates the memory of Mr. West, the historian of Tasmania, and a stained-glass window is a memorial of Mr. William Stammers Button, the first Mayor of Launceston…”

“…The window to the memory of the first Mayor bears this inscription:- “In loving memory of William Stammers Button, M.L.C., for nearly 40 years deacon of this church, also the first mayor of Launceston, and Marianne, his wife, this window is dedicated.” There is also a stained-glass window to the memory of another mayor of Launceston, Mr. Landon Fairthorne, who died in 1890…”

The Mercury, Hobart, TAS, Saturday 7th March 1953, page 20.

“MR. WILLIAM STAMMERS BUTTON, who was Launceston’s first mayor, and held office from 1853 to 1856. Mr. Button was associated with the beginnings of the Princes Square Independent Church, now Christ Church, where a memorial window honours his name.”

The Mercury, Hobart, TAS, Saturday 7th March 1953, page 20.

The Mercury, Hobart, TAS, Saturday 7th March 1953, page 20.

Launceston Examiner, Tasmania, Tuesday 19th September 1876, page 2.

“THE LATE MR W.S. BUTTON. (1876, September 19). Launceston

One more old colonist has finished his course. Mr. W. Button died peacefully at his residence, St. John-street, at a quarter-past eight on Sunday morning, aged 80 years, having lived in Tasmania 43 years. He was born at Nayland, in Suffolk, in the year 1795, where his early boyhood was spent, removing to Sudbury, in the same county, while yet young, in which place he was associated in business with his uncle, in whose service he frequently travelled to various parts of England, visiting also France and Flanders, when travelling by land and sea was attended by numerous perils. He was wont to recount to some of his friends the incidents of his wintry voyages and long journeys by coach, contrasting them with modern methods of conveyance. From his retentive memory he would sometimes recall the state of England in his youthful days during the awful struggles of the Peninsular war, and describe with the graphic power of a keen observer those days of dear bread, iron rule, and wearing anxiety. On his marriage he removed to Long Melford, a place historically famous like the other towns where he had lived. While there, he took an active part in politics, working hard on the liberal side, and especially seeking with others the repeal of “The Test and Corporation Acts,” which was happily accomplished in the year 1828. In 1833 he came to this colony in the ship Forth, bound to Circular Head and Launceston. He was accompanied by his brother Mr Thomas Button, Mr J. S. Waddell, and other members of his family. He first took up his residence at Norfolk Plains, removing to Launceston for business purposes. During his 40 years residence in Launceston he has been one of our most prominent and useful citizens. He was from the beginning one of the chief members of the Anti-Transportation League, giving cheerfully of his time and money. He was among the earliest promoters of the Cornwall Insurance Company in 1842, one of its first Directors, for many years Chairman of the Company, and to the last was warmly devoted to its interests. When Launceston was declared a municipality he was elected a member of the first Council and its first Mayor on January 1st, 1853. He filled the office by successive elections for four years, and during his mayoralty the chief portion of the work was done in supplying the town with water – a work that took up much of his time, yet by some strange oversight no notice is taken of his efforts on the commemorative fountain in Prince’s Square or on the pillar at St. Patrick’s River. Mr Button was appointed a justice of the peace in 1855, and has rendered good service in that capacity, his clear judicial mind eminently fitting him for the post. In October, 1856, he was elected a member of the Legislative Council for Tamar, and served in that capacity for six years. In the Council he was looked upon as a valuable member. His unobtrusive manners, wide experience, and extensive knowledge made him a man of power; he was firm and fearless – an independent member, one courteous and true. With the Launceston and Western Railway Mr Button was connected from the very beginning. Anxious to see the colony advance he gave labour and money to aid in improving our means of transit. For a while he was chairman of the Railway Company, till increasing years compelled him to retire. As one of the early shareholders of the Gas Company and a Director from its formation until his death, he took great interest in its working, and read carefully to qualify himself for his duties. Mr Button was also one of the chief agents in establishing the Launceston Examiner, though he never took an active part in the management; and was also one of the founders of the Launceston Mechanics’ Institute, of which he was subsequently President. It may be safely said that few men have ever striven more zealously and unselfishly than Mr Button did to advance the interests of our town, district, and colony. It cannot be expected that all his public actions will have secured the approval of all men, but there are none who will not admit that his integrity of purpose, his resolute method of work, his general wisdom, and his hearty sympathy with all onwards movements, were beyond question. Those who knew Mr Button best were most aware that he was distinguished for his religious zeal: he was a man who feared God, and sought to serve his day and generation as one who must give account at last. No notice of his life amongst us, even in a public newspaper like this, would be complete that passed over this aspect of his life. As a friend and fellow-worker of the late Rev. J. West, he greatly aided in the building and support of the Prince’s Square Independent Church. From the formation of the congregation until within a recent period he had served the church faithfully as Treasurer, for a short time was Superintendent of the Sunday school, and at his death was senior deacon. He also for many years acted as Treasurer of the Northern Branch of the Congregational Home Mission, and had taken an active interest in the working of the mission on the N.W. Coast. In his death the Bible Society loses an attached friend. As a working member of it’s local committee, and subsequently President for years, until failing health compelled him to resign, he gave one of the many proofs of the catholic nature of his religious principles and life. We have been given to understand that not withstanding the conservatism natural to old age, Mr Button had very considerable acquaintance and sympathy with many liberal forms of modern thought on religious matters. Mr Button’s family life is not a theme to dwell upon in a newspaper, but it may be mentioned that a few months ago his golden wedding was appropriately honored by a few friends, on which occasion he ascribed much of his public usefulness to his happy home life. He has left many sincere friends, who will cherish his memory to the very last. His interest in al things relating to colonial life was as fresh and strong as in his days of robust strength and willing work.

Though old, he still retained
His manly sense and energy of mind;
Virtuous and wise he was, but not severe,
He still remembered that once he was young.

Most of places of business wee partially closed yesterday as a mark of respect for the deceased gentleman, and the Municipal Council adjourned immediately after meeting for the same reason. The funeral will take place this afternoon, friends assembling at Prince’s Square Congregational Church at half-past three”.

The Mercury, Hobart, TAS, Tuesday 19th September 1876, page 3.

“OUR LAUNCESTON LETTER.
[From our own correspondent.]
LAUNCESTON, Monday morning.

“I regret to have to record the death, at about a quarter past eight o’clock on Sunday morning, at his residence St. John-street, of Mr. William Stammers Button, at the ripe age of 81 years. Mr. Button is a very old colonist, having arrived in the colony in 1832. He first settled in Longford, where he entered into partnership with a brother-in=law, the late Mr. William Waddell, in the establishment of a brewery on that township. After carrying on the business for some three years at Longford the firm removed to Launceston, taking the premises then known as Barnes’ brewery, opposite the gaol, and in this business Mr. Button continued til 1853. Up to this time he had been very active in taking part in all matters calculated to promote the advancement of the town, and initiating schemes of public utility. When municipal institutions were established in 1853, Mr. Button was one of the first members, and the first mayor elected. The election of mayor at that time was for two years, and Mr. Button was elected twice in succession, holding the office for four years. He then retired from the municipal council. In Oct., 1856 he was elected a representative of the Tamar in the Legislative Council, and filled that position til 1862. He had always been considered an industrious and energetic patron of Agricultural and Horticultural pursuits, and a liberal contributor to any institution calculated to improve the condition of his fellow townspeople. In public life he has taken a very active part. He was one of the founders of the Cornwall Insurance Company established in 1842, and has been connected with it ever since having occupied the position of chairman of directors till within a short time of his death. He was also one of the founders of the Mechanics’ Institute, established in the same year, and has ever since evinced a lively interest in its rise and progress. In the initiatory stages of the agitation for a water supply to the town he took a prominent part, and it was mainly through his instrumentality that the great boon of a waterworks was obtained. In the establishment of the Launceston Steam Navigation Company, which is now incorporated in the Tasmanian Steam Navigation Company, and in the support given to the Launceston Gas Company, of which he was for many years a director, he contributed greatly to their success. In all religious and philanthropic efforts Mr. Button was always to the fore, and amongst other positions he held for some time was that of the President of the Bible Society. He was connected with the Congregational denomination, and attended the Prince’s Square Church, of which the Rev. Wm. Law is the pastor. To the erection of this handsome and commodious edifice the deceased gentleman contributed largely, and continued his liberality up to the time of his death. He was generally esteemed by the townspeople as an honourable and upright man, and a steadfast friend, and his decease is universally regretted. Although the deceased gentleman’s health and strength had been visibly declining some time, it was not till a few days ago that any serious consequences were anticipated by his friends. He attended divine service on Sunday the 10th inst., and was working in his garden on Thursday last. On Thursday night, however, serious symptoms manifested themselves, and he then sank rapidly up to the time of his death, which took place on Sunday morning. The pastor of Prince’s Square Church, the Rev. Wm. Law, in his morning service, both in his prayer and sermon, alluded in feeling terms to the long connection of Mr. Button with the church, and his many excellent qualities, and then announced that the funeral service would take place on Tuesday afternoon, at three o’clock, at the church; and that on the following Sunday evening he should preach a memorial sermon.”

The Mercury, Hobart, TAS, Thursday 21st September 1876, page 3.

“The funeral of Mr. William Stammers Button left his late residence, St. John-street, at 25 minutes past 3 this afternoon, arriving at the Prince’s Square Congregational Church about half-past 3. During the passing of the funeral cortege to the church, the bell of St. Andrew’s Church was tolled. The funeral service was conducted by the Rev. J. Lindsay and the Rev. C. Price, after which the Rev. W. Law delivered a funeral oration in which he commented at length on the many estimable qualities of the deceased, and his long and useful career. The funeral was largely attended, and after leaving the church the procession was formed in the following order:- The Revs. W. Law, J. Lindsay, and C. Price; next Drs. Miller and Hardy; then the hearse with the following gentlemen acting as pall bearers:- Messrs. E. L. Diteham, H. Dowling, E. Dickens, J. Kemp, F.L. Fyah and J. Steer, senr. Alderman C. S. Button, son of the deceased gentleman, followed, and with him the other near relations and connections of the deceased. The Mayor, the Town Clerk, the members of the corporation and those of eh Maritime board cam next, and then followed a long procession, there being some 200 persons present. The remains were conveyed to their last resting place the cemetery in Mulgrave Square.”

The Cornwall Chronicle, Launceston, TAS, Monday 2nd October 1876, page 4.

“THE LATE MR. W. S. BUTTON

 Mr. William Stammers Button died at his residence, St. John street, Launceston, on the morning of Sunday, 17th September, a little after eight o’clock. His illness had been a very short one. He was about as usual on the 13th September, was taken unwell in the course of the evening, gradually sank into a comatose state, and passed quietly away. Mr. Button came to the colony 43 years ago, and after a short residence at Norfolk Plains came to Launceston, where he won for himself a large measure of general respect and confidence. His active public life has brought him into connection with most local objects. As the first mayor of Launceston from 1st January, 1853, to 31st December, 1857, Mr Button had a great amount of work to perform, and during his mayoralty the chief difficulties connected with the water supply of Launceston overcome. He was for some years a member of the Legislative Council of this Colony, in which capacity his services were highly valued. Mr Button was one of the promoters of the Launceston and Western Railway, for a long time chairman of the company, and was ever ready to aid in all public works. His devotion to the interests of the Cornwall Insurance Company was well known; as its chairman for many years, he was one of he most trusted counsellors. He was a director of the Launceston gas Company. We believe that few men amongst us were more zealous and useful in public life than the subject of our notice. All our local societies of a philanthropic and religious kind shared in his gifts and labors [sic]. Mr Button was also well known in association with Prince’s Square Independent Church, of which he had been a member and officer from its formation til the time of his death, and was always a liberal supporter of its funds. He was a man who early in life had received a good education, was gifted with considerable natural powers, and had always been a great reader. Mixed up as Mr Button had been in many questions in which considerable diversity of opinion prevailed, it cannot be expected that he always in his public life pleased everyone; but he was recognised throughout his long career as a man whose wish was to do good, and one who had fully identified himself with the land of his adoption. In private life Mr Button was an intelligent companion – a kind and faithful friend. He lived to reach the age of eighty years.”

The Mercury, Hobart, TAS, Tuesday 26th September 1876, page 3.

“At the Prince’s Square Congregational Church on Sunday evening, the Rev. Wm. Law delivered a memorial sermon on the death of the late Mr. William Stammers Button, choosing his text from Acts, xiii., 36. “For David after he had served his own generation by the will of God fell on sleep.” Both the body of the church and the galleries were filled. The rev. gentleman made the text the basis of an appropriate and impressive sermon, and concluded with an enumeration of the many acts of philanthropic and Christian usefulness, which had marked the long and honoured life of their departed townsman.”

Launceston Examiner, TAS, Saturday 14th January 1843, page 7.

“SUPREME COURT, CRIMINAL SITTINGS.
THURSDAY, JANUARY 12.
The Queen, at the instance of W. S. Button, v. W. L. Goodwin, for printing and publishing a malicious libel…”

On the 16th of April, William Lushington Goodwin published in the Cornwall Chronicle the following malicious libel against William Stammers Button:-

“In all transactions let us honest be,
And honour give to strict integrity,
Let bolters by their creditors be scouted,
And their professions afterwards be doubted;
In whatsoever clime they take their fight
Let them be doomed to everlasting night,
And honest men with them all business shun,
Fearful they might again up stick and run!
For Button may once more design,
For the same reason choose to cross the line,
Which once he crossed. God knows the reason –
Whether for highway robbery or treason.
But true it is, as Williams he did fly
He’s Button now – though folks say ‘tis a lie’;
Some day the truth will out, if not too late.
And that the bolter will not ‘scape his fate’;
Perhaps the hulks – perhaps a halter –
Exhibited to public gaze – this malster,
Newspaper-man, hypocrite and bolter.”

Goodwin was found guilty of the libelous slander against Button and ordered to pay a fine to the Queen of £30 and be imprisoned until it was paid. He paid it immediately!

04-03-1882: St Matthew’s Church, New Norfolk, Tasmania.

The Anglican Church of St Matthew is in Bathurst Street New Norfolk, opposite Arthur Square. It was built in 1823 and is the oldest church in Tasmania. The church was consecrated in 1828 by Archdeacon Scott from Sydney and has been altered a number of times since. In 1833 extensive additions transformed it significantly. The tower was added in 1870 (no longer exists) and in 1894,the chancel was added and the windows, roof and transepts also altered. All that remains of the original church are the walls, floor of the nave, and part of the western transept.

The church contains many historical stained glass windows, among which are the ‘Moore’ and ‘Sharland’ stained glass windows crafted by Ferguson & Urie of North Melbourne.

Photos taken 7th October 2010:

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

[View all images]

The Mercury Hobart, Tasmania, Saturday 4th March 1882, page 3.

“… The church is without pretentions to good looks – it is neither imposing nor elegant. Yet with all its plainness it is a building endeared to many by sacred associations; and also contains features of interest to the visitor. Over the communion table is a stained glass window, representing our lord’s interview with the two disciples at Emmaus, and erected by Mr. W. S. Sharland, in memory of his first wife. Another stained glass window, placed at the back of the font, and representing the baptism of Christ in the River Jordan, was presented by the late Dr. Moore and his son, to commemorate their escape from shipwreck on the occasion of the loss of the s.s. City of Launceston in Hobson’s Bay…”

The Dr. Moore window:

On the evening of 20th November 1865 the ‘SS City of Launceston’ departed Launceston and within two hours of departure it had collided with the SS Penola from Adelaide in Hobson’s Bay. All passengers and crew were rescued by the severely damaged Penola before the Launceston sank.

“…One cabin passenger, Dr. Moore, got his portmanteau, containing £100 in money, into the boat, but it fell overboard [1]

It was thought that the SS City of Launceston could be raised and tenders were called for the work however this never eventuated. Although there were many newspaper reports in 1865 that appeared to describe the exact location of where the ship sank, the Maritime Archaeologists Association of Victoria only found the intact wreck in 1980.

Dr. John Anthony Moore died on the 6th of July 1878 at New Norfolk aged 62[2].

The text on the Moore memorial window reads:

“S. Mark 1:9” “ERECTED BY J. A. MOORE, SENr & JUNr, TO COMMEMORATE A DELIVERANCE FROM SHIPWRECK, NOVr 19th, 1865”.

The window depicts St. John the Baptist, Babtising Christ in the river Jordan.

The Sharland window:

The text on the Sharland memorial window reads:

“TO THE GLORY OF GOD  AND IN MEMORY OF FRANCES SARAH WIFE OF WILLIAM STANLEY SHARLAND WHO DIED ON THE VIIIth DAY OF MARCH IN THE YEAR OF OUR LORD MDCCLIX” (8th March 1859).

Although the biblical scene the window represents is not written anywhere on the window, Janice Ball, from New Zealand, has identified it (07 Apr 2012) as “Emmaus” (Luke 25: 13-37) where Christ is seen breaking bread with two disciples who were walking from Jerusalem to Emmaus .

WikipediaThe two disciples have heard the tomb of Jesus was found empty earlier that day. They are discussing the events of the past few days when a stranger asks them what they are discussing. “Their eyes were kept from recognizing him.” He soon rebukes them for their unbelief and gives them a Bible study on prophecies about the Messiah. On reaching Emmaus, they ask the stranger to join them for the evening meal. When he breaks the bread “their eyes were opened” and they recognize him as the resurrected Jesus. Jesus immediately vanishes”.

The top third of the window has the symbol letters “IHS”. The centre depicts three men with Christ in the middle with a disciple on either side and Christ is breaking bread. The lower has a rather unusual depiction of the Hexagram or Star of David.

Related posts: 07-08-1867 > 13-08-1867

External Links:

Web Site: Diving the City of Launceston Shipwreck

Obit: Dr Moore (no mention of his past shipwreck though!)

Bio: William Stanley Sharland (1803-1877)

Obit: William Stanley Sharland (1801-1877)

Footnotes:

Short link to this page: http://wp.me/p28nLD-xr

© Copyright

27-12-1881: St Paul’s Anglican Church, Launceston, Tasmania.

In 1881 a Ferguson & Urie three light stained glass window depicting the “Resurrection and the life, Good Shepherd, and Light of the world” was supposed to have been erected in the chancel of St Paul’s, Launceston and unveiled on Christmas day 1881. Unfortunately the company couldn’t complete the window in time and requested an extension.

By April 1882 the three light chancel window was in place and at the same time two other single light windows by Ferguson & Urie, depicting St Peter and St Paul, were awaiting arrival to be subsequently placed either side of the chancel.

The church was demolished circa 1875 to make way for the Launceston Hospital. Nothing has yet been ascertained as to the location of these stained glass windows, but a three light window of English manufacture, erected in St Paul’s in 1886, is now located in St Paul’s Chapel by the Sea at Low Head.

Launceston Examiner, Tasmania, Tuesday 27th December 1881, page 3.

“CHRISTMAS DAY ….”

“… As usual the church of St. Paul’s was decorated very chastely and effectively, and perhaps suffered no loss by comparison with more extensive Christmas decorations in previous years…”

 “… At the close of the sermon in the morning, the incumbent alluded to one feature of Christmas greeting which he regretted the absence of, and which he hoped would be there that day, viz, a stained glass window for the chancel, which was to replace the painted one, which so often became an eye-sore when the paint began to peel off. A parishioner, in humble circumstances, had liberally offered to pay the cost of the new window, but through press of business Messrs Ferguson and Uril [sic], of Melbourne, had not been able to complete it in time for Christmas; and as they wished to do the work well, they asked a little extension of time. Probably a few weeks more will see this addition in its place, and it will not be the less welcomed through not making its first appearance at the Christmas festival.”

Launceston Examiner, Tasmania, Tuesday 11th April 1882, page 3.

“During Holy Week, owing to alterations, which were being made in connection with putting up the stained glass window in the Chancel of St. Paul’s Church, the daily service was held in the adjoining School-room….”

“… Before commencing the sermon in the evening, he alluded with feelings of thankfulness to the hearty and earnest services of Good Friday, and expressed his gratitude that the ugly painted window in the Chancel had given place to the handsome one, which those who were present in the morning had the privilege of witnessing the full effect of…”

“….and with pleasure announced that two additional stained glass windows had been liberally presented to the church, to be placed at the end of each aisle, right and left of the chancel. One window would represent St. Paul, whose name of the church and parish bear, and the other St. Peter, his brother apostle, and these windows would probably be finished in about three months. The chancel window, the noble and generous gift of a working man in the parish, consists of three lights; the central one containing a representation of Christ as the “Good Shepherd”, underneath this figure is the lamb with banner and cross, and above it the I.H.S., and alpha and omega in very rich colours. To the right is Christ as the “Light of the world;” above, the symbol of St. Mark, and below, that of St. John. To the left is Christ as the “Resurrection and the life,” with the symbol of St. Matthew above, and St. Luke below. Taken altogether the window is very pleasing and effective, and was supplied by Messrs Ferguson and Urie, of Melbourne, who will also provide the two additional windows….”

 

Tasmanian Govt, LINC, Record NG472, accessed 24 Mar 2012:

“The Anglican Parish of St Paul’s was officially created and opened on 15 October 1854. Prior to this it was part of the Parish of St John’s, Launceston. It comprised the church of St Paul’s in Cleveland Street. On 5 October 1975 the final service was conducted in the church prior to its demolition to make way for redevelopment of the Launceston General Hospital on the church site. The demolition was agreed upon only if the hospital recycled the building as much as possible. Much of the fabric and contents of the St Paul’s church went to Low Head and were used in the construction of St Paul’s Chapel by the Sea, an interdenominational church which by c. 2000 was incorporated into the Ainslie House Aged Care Complex at Low Head.  The chapel built at the redevelopment of the Launceston General Hospital was named St Paul’s chapel”.

The Organs Historical Trust of Australia record for Christ Church Low Head, accessed 24 Mar 2012:

“This substantial brick church was opened around 1980. It contains many fittings from St Paul’s Anglican Church, Launceston including the stained glass, memorial tablets and organ. St Paul’s was a large timber church to the south of the city centre close to the Launceston General Hospital”.

 

 



21-03-1871: Struan House, Launceston, Tasmania, Australia.

In Cameron-street in Launceston, Tasmania, stands the historical Supreme Court Building originally built in 1870-71 as “Struan House”[1] for the wealthy Scottish Colonist James Robertson. It was designed by architect Peter Mills[2] and constructed by building contractor Edward Ford.

In 1893 the building was used as a private maternity hospital and in 1929 was acquired by the Tasmanian Government for use by the Launceston Supreme Court.

During the construction of Struan House in early 1871 the Launceston Examiner tabloid reported;

“…We must not omit to mention that the side and fan lights of the entrance door, and of the doors leading out on to the verandah and balcony are glazed with rich designs in stained glass, manufactured by the well known firm of Ferguson, Urie, and Lyon, of Melbourne…”[3]

In 2011, enquiries revealed that there is still an original piece of Ferguson & Urie stained glass above a doorway in the building having the year 1870 emblazoned on it!

On the 18th April 2011 Mr Chris Nason, wrote:

“Dear Ray, Thankyou for your email. I confirm that Struan House does still exist and has been maintained as part of the Supreme Court since 1929. In terms of stained glass the only item that remains is above a door that opens onto the north facing balcony. I have taken a couple of shots of the window and attached for you. Unfortunately the shot from outside is not great. I hope this is of some use to you. Regards Chris Nason, District Registrar, Supreme Court of Tasmania…“

Photos kindly provided by Mr Chris Nason, 18th April 2011.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

James Robertson (1800- 18741800- 1874).

James Robertson was a native of Alvey, Inverness-shire, Scotland and arrived in Van Diemen’s Land in the early 1820’s where he joined his brothers John, William and Daniel, breeding sheep and cattle in the Campbelltown district.

Later they diversified to form Robertson Brothers Mercantile Importers in Elizabeth Street Hobart in 1829[4], run by John & William, and in Brisbane-street Launceston in 1831[5], headed by James and Daniel.

On the 18th of November 1833, at St David’s Church in Hobart, James married Mary McDonald, daughter of Roderick McDonald of Glengarry[6].

James had been a Justice of the Peace in Launceston since September of 1843 and was a supporter of the anti-transportation of convicts to the colony. In 1853 he declined requests to stand for the election of the first Mayor of Launceston[7] which was subsequently won, under much controversy, by William Stammers Button.

He was a local director of the Union bank of Australia and had been Captain and Paymaster of the Volunteer Artillery[8] and for many years was the treasurer[9] of the Launceston branch of the ‘St Andrew’s Society’ [10]

In January 1841 his brother Daniel had decided to dissolve his partnership leaving James as sole proprietor of the Launceston Mercantile business[11]. Just over twelve months later, on the 12th March 1842, Daniel drowned in the Esk River whilst on a fishing trip with friends[12]. In 1848 unknown persons referred to as “miscreants” attempted to rob Daniel’s grave![13].

In February 1850 James’ wife Mary died at the age of 35 [14] and on the 28th of May 1851 he married Mary’s younger sister Margaret, the eighth daughter of Roderick McDonald of Glengarry[15].

James Robertson died on the 1st of April 1874[16] and was interred in the Robertson family vault at the Scotch Cemetery in Launceston[17]. His wife Margaret died on the 3rd of September 1891[18].

His former residence ‘Struan House’ now forms part of the Launceston Supreme Court. Only the top portion of a fan light window above a doorway in the building exists of the original Ferguson & Urie stained glass created in 1871.

Of coincidental interest, James Robertson’s elder brother William went on to become one of the largest landholders in the western district of Victoria and in 1877 the Ferguson & Urie Company created a large ‘Rose’ stained glass window which was erected to his memory in St Andrew’s Presbyterian Church at Colac, Victoria.

Significant transcriptions:

Launceston Examiner, Tas, 15th January 1853, page 4.

“MR. JAMES ROBERTSON. FEW inhabitants better deserve the tribute of respect about to be paid to him on his departure for Britain, than Mr Robertson. In his sphere of public usefulness, none have been more energetic and successful; and he has often taken the most arduous part, when a benevolent or popular object was in view. There can be no question that if he had assented to the request recently addressed to, him, he would have been the first Mayor of Launceston. But business arrangements prevented compliance, and the St. Andrew’s Society, of which he is a” pillar,” have gracefully come forward to recognise his claims to general esteem. In his commercial career he has been successful, and as a staunch anti-transportationist, he will doubtless exert his influence at home, in favor of the land of his adoption; and the birth-place of his children. The invitations to gentlemen, not members of the St. Andrew’s Club, ought to be very extensive, or they should be permitted, at their own cost, to be present on the occasion. We heartily wish him a pleasant voyage home, success in his mission, and a safe and speedy return.”

The Launceston Examiner, Tuesday 21st March 1871, page 2.

 “MR. ROBERTSON’S NEW RESIDENCE. The new residence of James Robertson, Esq., situate in Cameron-street near the old Military Barracks, and now rapidly approaching completion, is a building that deserves something more than a mere passing notice, for it is one of the best finished, and certainly the most commodious of private dwellings on this side of the island. Erected on the summit of a gentle slope which extends down to the bank of the River Tamar, it commands a fine view of the windings of that stream, and a still finer view of the Cataract on the South Esk, with its bold romantic scenery, and the pretty light looking iron bridge which spans the entrance to what may fairly be termed on of the lions of Launceston. Turning his back on these, a considerable portion of the town is presented to the gaze of the spectator. But the building itself is an ornament to the town, and forms a prominent object that that is sure to attract the attention of visitors or others sailing up the river. The main building is in style Italian, and two storeys high. The walls are constructed of brick, the dressings to the windows, string courses, quoins, cornices, chimneys, and the enrichments generally being executed in Portland cement. The brickwork is uniform in color, and neatly finished with a white joint. The roofs are of slate, and the roof of the main building overhangs the wall about three feet, the projection being supported by ornamental cantalivers [sic]. The front of the building faces the north, but there is an entrance on the east, by means of a massive looking porch and steps. On the ground floor are the large entrance hall, staircase hall, dining, drawing, breakfast and ball rooms, also a business room. The entrance hall is divided from the staircase hall by fluted Corinthian columns and pilasters, supporting a decorated cornice of the same order. The dining and drawing rooms which are well proportioned, open into the entrance hall. The breakfast and ball rooms are entered from a wide corridor leading from the staircase hall to the kitchen, the former room being well lighted by a large bay window of clear plate-glass, from which an excellent view of the Cataract and Tamar can be obtained. The whole of the fittings are of bright cedar French polished, and the finishing’s round the hall side of the doors are ornamented and carved very handsomely. The principal rooms also have elaborately wrought marble mantle-pieces, and are enriched with light and elegant moulded cornices. A verandah, accessible from the staircase hall, runs round the front and a portion of the two sides of the building, terminating on one side against the kitchen wing, and on the other against the entrance porch; and above the verandah is a balcony accessible from the first landing of the staircase. The roof of this is curved and covered with corrugated iron, the railings, trellis work, and brackets being of cast iron, and in appearance very ornamental. The verandah and balcony are wide, and furnish a very agreeable promenade, in which the eye can not fail to be delighted with the surrounding scenery. We must not omit to mention that the side and fan lights of the entrance door, and of the doors leading out on to the verandah and balcony are glazed with rich designs in stained glass, manufactured by the well known firm of Ferguson, Urie, and Lyon, of Melbourne. The kitchen wing contains a large kitchen, scullery, washhouse, stores, pantries, and servants’ staircase. A first-class cooking range manufactured by Mr William Peter, Wellington-street, is fitted up in the kitchen, and from this, by means of pipes, the bedrooms on the upper floor are supplied with hot water for baths, &c. Underneath the building are dry cellars floored with cement. The upper or chamber floor is reached by a handsome staircase, having a continuous ornamental iron railing, and here we find a number of lofty, well-ventilated bedrooms with dressing and bathrooms attached. The nursery and servants’ bedrooms are placed over the kitchen, &c. The baths are fitted up so that hot or cold water can be turned on at pleasure. The whole of the fittings in the rooms, except the mantle pieces, are of French polished cedar. The court yard is enclosed by out-offices – including accommodation for men servants, a coach house, stables, harness room, cow house, hay loft – and by entrance gates, provision been made to get a carriage drive through this court yard round to the river frontage. The Cameron-street frontage is enclosed by an ornamental iron palisading of cast iron with gates, &c., to correspond.
The total cost of erecting these fine premises will be about ₤6000. Mr E. Ford is the contractor, and appears to have executed his work very faithfully. The buildings were designed by Mr Peter Mills, and have been erected under his vigilant superintendence, and we must say that the manner in which everything has been carried out reflects the greatest credit on him.”

Launceston Examiner, Tas, Thursday 2nd April 1874, page 2.

“OBITUARY
Another old colonist has gone from our midst: JAMES ROBERTSON, so long connected with various interests of Launceston, died last evening, in his 75th year, having completed his 74th on the 23rd of March.
After a few years’ occupation as sheep farmer in the Campbell Town district, in this colony, Mr Robertson came into Launceston in 1830, to enter into commercial business with his younger brother, Daniel, unfortunately drowned in the South Esk, in 1841 [sic], which business he carried on very successfully, first on premises now occupied by Messrs. Smith and Poole, and subsequently in the large premises built by the firm for the purpose now known as the International Hotel, until a comparatively recent period, when he retired from more active pursuits to the handsome residence he erected in Cameron-street, known as Struan House, and in which he died.

           Through a long mercantile career Mr Robertson maintained the character of a strictly honourable merchant, and sincere friend. Amongst his mercantile connections he numbered most of the older colonists; and he enjoyed the immediate friendship of an unusually large circle.
            There are some incidents of his “settler life” which possess unusual interest, at once characteristic of his personal courage and of the peculiar difficulties of early settlement in these colonies. On one occasion when sitting reading at the fire in his hut, his back to the door, he was surprised by the entrance of a notorious bushranger, with two equally notorious companions. They had previously secured his shepherd servant, and came so sudden upon him that resistance was useless. After helping themselves to provisions, they set off for a distant rendezvous, marching Mr Robertson and his servant before them, still tied, until they arrived at midnight, on the banks of the South Esk, at a crossing place where they expected to find a boat; which, however was on the opposite shore. One of the bushrangers crossed the river to fetch the boat for the conveyance of the party and their plunder; when the subject of our memoir, seeing an opportunity, succeeded in getting one of his arms sufficiently at liberty to get his hand into his pocket and secure a penknife. The robbers were so intently engaged in watching the progress of their companion that they gave to Mr Robertson the opportunity of communicating by signs, in the light of partial moonlight, with his servant; and after cutting the cord which confined his own arms, he cut that of his servant. They both remained in a position of apparent confinement until they could hear the splash of oars of the returning bushranger, when they each closed upon one of the confederates, and with the handkerchief torn from their own necks tied the hands of each. The man in the boat hearing the conflict turned for the other shore, but was promptly fired on with the arms now in the possession of Mr Robertson and his servant. The two prisoners were soon handed over to the police, and were conveyed to Launceston gaol; and on further enquiry the boat was found riddled with ball but abandoned by the robber, who was afterwards found wounded and captured. On another occasion the self-possession and courage of Mr Robertson were even more conspicuously displayed. A bushranger, who had become the terror of the district, occupied a mi-mi in the depths of the forest. Mr Robertson discovered it, or was informed of the locality – no matter which. Having obtained the co-operation of a neighboring settler he determined to effect capture. Keeping their secret they set out together for the place, but when they arrived found the fellow that occupied it away. They laid their plans accordingly – crouching themselves in the scrub until the evening, when they saw their man return, watched him dismantle himself of his fire-arms with the exception of pistols in his belt, cook his evening meal, and creep into his mi-mi. Mr Robertson immediately rushed in the aperture requiring almost a crawling posture whilst his settler friend made loud demonstrations of directing a body of men outside. He threatened to shoot the robber and disarm him, tied him securely, and led him out to show him (as Mr Robertson often told with considerable humour), to his great disgust, that he had been captured  by two nearly unarmed men!
            Mr Robertson’s genial countenance and bustling habits will long be missed in the streets of Launceston. He leaves an estimable widow, his second wife, and a large family, comfortably provide for. Mr Robertson has been in the Commission of the Peace since the 20th September, 1843. It will be remembered that his eldest brother William died in Victoria on 18th January last.”

Launceston Examiner, Tas, 9th April 1874, page 3.

“THE LATE MR  JAMES  ROBERTSON.

The funeral of the late Mr James Robertson took place on Tuesday afternoon, and was attended by a very large number of personal friends and others from various parts of the colony anxious to pay the last tribute of respect to the memory of one who had maintained business and social relations with the colonists, especially of the Northern districts, for so lengthened a period. By request of Mr Robertson communicated shortly before his decease, the funeral obsequies were superintended by his old friend, Mr Alderman Tyson, Messrs Richards and Son being the undertakers. The remains had been enclosed in a leaden coffin which was encased in a shell, neatly covered with black cloth, and suitably furnished. Shortly after 3 o’clock the coffin was   deposited in a plain hearse drawn by a pair of horses, and the mournful cortege left Struan House, deceased’s late residence in Cameron-street: the following gentlemen acting as pall-bearers, viz., the hon. James Aikenhead, M.L.C., a local Director of the Commercial Bank ; J. T. Sale, Esq., J.P., Manager of the Union Bank of Australia, of which deceased had been for many years a local director; C. J. Weedon, Esq., J.P., one of the Directors of the Bank of Tasmania; Thomas Corbett, Esq., J.P., a director of the Bank of Van Diemen’s Land; John Fawns, Esq., J.P., one of the Executive Committee of the Savings Bank; and Dr. Miller, J.P. The pall-bearers were flanked on either side by members of the Volunteer Artillery Corps, of which deceased had been Captain and Paymaster. The sons of deceased, Messrs. Hector and Angus Robertson were chief mourners with other relatives following; and in addition there were from 140 to 150 townsmen and colonists. There were also a number of private carriages behind. The route of the cortege was Cameron-street, Charles-street, Brisbane-street, and High-street to the Scotch Cemetery, where the family vault is situated; and the esteem in which deceased had been held by his fellow townsmen was evinced by the closing of the shops and other places of business along the line of route. The Revs. J. Gardner, W. Law, J. Lindsay, and R. M’Clean were among the ministers who attended. At the grave the Rev. R. McClean, of Hobart Town, read a portion of Scripture, and delivered an appropriate address. The Rev. J. Lindsay offered prayer. The coffin was borne to the hearse, and to the vault by the Volunteer Artillerymen.”

Footnotes:

[1] The Launceston Examiner, Tuesday 21st March 1871, page 2.

[2] Peter Mills also designed the Launceston Town Hall in 1864 and several other historical buildings in Launceston.

[10] Formed in 1841 to not only entice skilled labourers from Scotland to the Colony, but to provide friendship and assistance to them and their families and benevolent acts to their widows and orphans in times of need.

[17] The Scotch Cemetery opened in 1835 and closed in 1928. It was re-developed as “St. Andrew’s Gardens” from c.1951 with some of the grave stones transferred to the Carr Villa Cemetery.

03-03-1868: Wesleyan (Pilgrims Uniting) Church, Patterson street, Launceston, Tasmania.

Illustrated Australian News for Home Readers, Tuesday 3rd March 1868, page 3

“NEW WESLEYAN CHURCH PATTERSON-STREET, LAUNCESTON, TASMANIA”

“The new Wesleyan Church, in Patterson-street, Launceston, Tasmania, of which we give an engraving in the present number, was opened for worship on Friday, the 21st…”
“… The principal windows, front and rear, are fitted with stained glass, by Ferguson and Urie, of Melbourne…”

Launceston Examiner, Tasmania, Saturday 24th August 1867, page 4.

“WESLEYAN. Two stained glass decorative windows have been ordered from Melbourne for the Wesleyan Church now building in this town. They are to be of very handsome design and will be placed at either end of the edifice.”

This is now the Pilgrims Uniting Church, Launceston. The windows were ordered circa August 1867 from Melbourne. The large five light window facing Patterson street is twenty two feet high and absolutely stunning. No stained glass window was seen in the opposite end of the church on my visit in 2010 but Gavin Merrington from ‘Original Stained Glass’ at South Hobart has confirmed its existence and is hidden by the organ loft.

Photos taken 10th October 2010.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Related posts: 13-08-1867: James Urie visits Tasmania on Ferguson and Urie business. 

13-08-1867: James Urie visits Tasmania on Ferguson and Urie business.

In August 1867, James Urie of the Melbourne stained glass firm ‘Ferguson & Urie’, traveled to Tasmania with a portfolio of the companies designs for ecclesiastical and secular stained glass. As at May 2013, over twenty five Tasmanian buildings have been identified as having one or more extant stained glass windows by the firm. The newspaper article below contains a gold mine of clues and below it are my comments as to what is known on each clue.

The Mercury, Hobart Tasmania, Tuesday 13th August 1867, page 5.

 “STAINED WINDOWS – A few days since we stated that Mr. Urie of the firm of Ferguson, Urie, and Lyon, glass stainers, &c, Melbourne, was on a professional visit to Hobart Town. This gentleman is now in Launceston, and we were much gratified yesterday by inspecting a large portfolio of designs for church and other windows which his firm has executed or has in hand. Amongst the most elegant we may mention the chancel window of St. George’s Church, Queenscliff, the subject being taken from the Litany, whilst the side lights represent the twelve Apostles and the west window other emblems; chancel window of St. Peter’s, Wooloomooloo (Sydney), embracing nine events in the life of St. Peter; Roman Catholic Church of St. Peter and St. Paul, Geelong; St Joseph’s Roman Catholic Church, Collingwood; St. Patrick’s Church, Duneed; the Melbourne Convent; the Presbyterian Churches at West Melbourne and Ballan; the Wesleyan Churches at Daylesford and Kent Town (S. Australia). They have also erected some very elegant memorial windows including one for the late Prince Consort at Kew; Rev. R. W. Needham, at Mount Gambier; Dr. Peck, at Sale; Judge Pohlman’s wife, and wife of Mr Stoddart both in Melbourne. We have already referred to Dr. Moore’s at New Norfolk, and the two windows in St. John’s, Launceston. One of the most elegant windows is in the house of Mr. George Stevenson, at Toorak; it represents the four seasons with figures of Art, Science, Agriculture, and Commerce, with Faith and Hope, coat of arms, and crest. This window cost £250. This firm also supplied a staircase window for the new mansion of the Hon. R. Q. Kermode at Mona Vale, but it has been decided to substitute one much more elaborate. They are also to fit up two windows for the new Wesleyan Church of this town – one at either end, which will be very handsome. Several private homes in this town, and a large number in Victoria, have been ornamented in this way, and no doubt the practice will extend when it is known how skilfully the art is carried out by Messrs. Ferguson & Co.”

Notes:

1. Queenscliff, Victoria, St Georges, All windows extant.
Related posts: 22-02-186429-01-1866 > 12-02-1881 07-04-188230-12-1893

2. Wooloomooloo, Sydney, NSW, St Peter’s (Darlinghurst), now part of Sydney Church of England Girls Grammar School.
Related posts: 1867: St Peter’s Anglican Church, Woolloomooloo, Sydney, New South Wales.

3. Geelong, Victoria, St Peter & Paul Catholic. Three light principal east window.
Related post: 13-08-1867: St Peter & St Paul, Geelong, Victoria.

4. Collingwood, Melbourne, Roman Catholic (St Joseph’s) destroyed by fire in 2007.
See: 1863: St Joseph’s Catholic Church, Collingwood, Victoria.

5. Duneed, Victoria, St Patrick’s (Mt Moriac) foundation laid in 1858. Ferguson & Urie east window erected in 1866 but was destroyed my a massive hail storm in 1887. The church was rebuilt in 1950’s and sold at auction in February 2017..

6. Melbourne, Victoria, the “Melbourne Convent”. This is likely to be the “Convent of Our Immaculate Lady of Mercy” in Nicholson street Fitzroy. Nothing known yet.

7. West Melbourne, Presbyterian. Dismantled in 1935 and re-erected as St Andrews at Box Hill in 1936. It contains the original windows except one which went to the Camberwell Church.
Related posts: 27-04-1935

8. Ballan, Victoria, Presbyterian (St Paul’s). All windows are extant.
Related posts: > 22-07-1866 > 28-07-1866 > 13-08-1867

9. Daylesford, Victoria, Wesleyan. Only small ‘stock’ windows in the porch exist in poor condition.

10. Kent Town, South Australia, Wesleyan. Nothing further known.
Related posts: 26-10-1864

11. Kew, Melbourne. The Prince Consort window at Holy Trinity is extant and recently restored.
Related posts: 08-06-1881

12. Mount Gambier, Christ Church, Rev Needham memorial window and others are extant.
Related posts: 02-11-1867

13. Sale, Victoria, St Paul’s Anglican Cathedral. Dr. Peck memorial window is extant.
Related post: 29-01-1867

14. Melbourne, Pohlman and Stoddart memorial windows. Not much known!

Pohlman:

Judge Robert Williams Pohlman (1811-1877): Biography | Obit 1877 | Funeral | Obit 1878 His funeral was in St Stephen’s in Richmond and he was buried in the Melbourne General Cemetery on the 8th Dec 1877. He was married twice. His second wife, Mercy Clifton Bachelor?, died of an embolism at age 26 on the 21st January 1876 only a couple of weeks after giving birth to a still born daughter on the 5th January 1876. He only had one daughter to his second wife named Annie who married Navy Commander Frederick Owen Pike at St John’s in Toorak on the 27th December 1893.

This would mean that the stained glass window would have been a memorial to his first wife “Eliza” who died at Richmond on about the 11th Feb 1856.

Stoddart/Stodart:

This is James Dickson Stodart (c1825-1867), Mayor of Prahran 1864/65 and councillor 1858/59-1859/60, 1863/64-1864/65.

Arrived from Edinburgh in 1853. Was later a financial agent for Cornish & Bruce railway contractors.

Active member of the Scotch Presbyterian Church in Punt Road South Yarra, where his memirial stained glass window resides.

He died on Wednesday 12th June 1867. The window has been found at the South Yarra Presbyterian Church See: http://wp.me/p28nLD-2I3.

15. New Norfolk, Tasmania, St Matthew’s, Dr. Moore memorial window is extant.
Related posts: 04-03-1882

16. Launceston, St John’s: The window is extant but no longer in its original position. The canopy glass above the main three lights no longer exists but an original design for the window shows that it contained the descending Dove and the symbols for Alpha and Omega.
Full details see  post: 25-09-1866

17. George Stevenson’s house at Toorak was named “Trawalla” and is located at 22 Lascelles Avenue Toorak. Window is extant.

18. Ross, Tasmania, Kermode’s Mona Vale Mansion. This window still exists. Images are shown in various historical books written in the last 30 years.

19. Launceston, Wesleyan, (Pilgrims Uniting), window facing Patterson street is extant but nothing seen in opposite end. Gavin Merrington from Hobart has confirmed that a wheel window exists above the organ loft.

Also see: 07-08-1867: Decorative Art. James Urie sojourning in Tasmania.

Other related posts: 03-03-1868 , 29-01-1866, 20-06-1867, 29-04-1864,


Short link to this page: http://wp.me/p28nLD-98

25-10-1865: The 1866 Melbourne Exhibition.

 The Argus, Melbourne, Thursday 25th October 1866, page 5,
The Argus, Melbourne, Saturday 27th October 1866, page 2s.
The Launceston Examiner, Monday 29th October 1866, page 3,
The Goulburn Herald and Chronicle, NSW, Saturday 3rd November 1866, page 2.

“OPENING OF THE EXHIBITION”.

“The third Melbourne Exhibition of natural products and works of art was formally opened by His Excellency the Governor at noon yesterday, in the presence of a large concourse of ladies and gentlemen. […]”

“THE VICTORIAN COURTS MAIN HALL”.

“The centre and left side of the main hall are occupied entirely by Victorian products. The display in these courts is extensive and varied. It is natural that the wealthiest and most populous of the colonies should be the largest contributor to the exhibition;…”

“… At the interior side of the mediaeval department, Messrs. Ferguson, Urie, and Lyon, glass stainers, North Melbourne, exhibit and early English chancel, decorated in a highly artistic style. In the centre of the ceiling is the Agnus Dei, surrounded with inscription and Gothic clouds. Radiating from this are twelve panels each containing an emblem of the twelve apostles. The walls are neatly diapered. Over the altar table is an illuminated oil painting of the “Last Supper,” on each side of which are illuminated tablets of the Commandments, creed, and Lord’s Prayer. The windows, five in number, are of stained glass and illustrate the Nativity, Passion, Crucifixion, Resurrection, and Ascension, intended for the Episcopalian Church at Casterton. Over the windows is the scripture text, “Blessed be the Lord God of Israel, for he hath visited and redeemed his people. In the medieval court, the same firm exhibit a variety of stained glass windows, the principal of which are a Salvator Mundi, a memorial , and a heraldic device, besides numerous samples of stained and embossed glass. In embossed plate, they exhibit two samples- one with stained borders, and suited for a hall window; the other a large plate, nine feet by four, for the staircase of Mr. W. J. Greig, of Toorak. In the fine-arts court, they exhibit numerous coloured designs of windows they have executed during the past five years. The whole of the articles shown by this firm are made on their own premises, and show a very satisfactory state of art in this department…”

Nothing further is known about the staircase window mentioned for W. J. Greig of Toorak.