05-03-1949: Charles William Hardess (1859-1949)

Charles William Hardess (1859-1949) was the son of George Mathew Hardess (1827-1909) and Mary Ann McCarthy (1834-1889) . He began his career at the Ferguson and Urie stained glass company as an apprentice stained glass artist circa 1873. As part of his apprenticeship he attended the Hotham School of Art which was formed in 1873 by prominent members of the Ferguson & Urie company and his father, George, was Honorary Superintendent of the school (1877) as well as reader of the Legislative Assembly.

C. W. Hardess married Janet ‘Jessie’ Gilchrist Pie on the 28th October 1886 and they had three known children. William, Hilda and Elsie.

After the Ferguson & Urie company closed in 1899, he teamed up with another employee of the firm, Frank Clifford Lording (1860-1944), to become ‘Hardess & Lording’. They are known to have done the lead-lighting for the homestead ‘Warra’ in Wangaratta (sometime after 1908). C. W. Hardess was buried in the Burwood cemetery 1st March 1949.[1]

The Argus, Melbourne, Vic Saturday 13th November 1886, page 1.

“HARDESS-PIE.- On the 28th ult., at the residence of the bride’s parents, Ravenscraig, Flemington-road, Hotham, by the Rev. R. Short, Charles W., second son of George K, Hardess, Royal-park, to Jessie G., eldest daughter of Captain W. Pie, Hotham.”

The Argus, Melbourne, Saturday 5th March 1949, page 15.

“HARDESS.- On February 28 at the residence of his daughter, 8 Martin crescent, Glen Iris, Charles William, loved husband of the late Jessie G., and loving father of William G., Hilda (Mrs. Ellis), and the late Elsie Vera (Mrs. Clark), aged 90 years”.

Charles William Hardess. Photo taken for the June 1887 North Melbourne company dinner


Related posts:

19-02-1874: The Hotham (North Melbourne) School of Art.

Footnotes:

[1] The Argus, Melbourne, Tuesday 1st March 1949, page 9. Note: There is no on-line record of the surname Hardess at the Burwood Cemetery.


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